Perioperative Medicine  |   February 2017
Perioperative Outcomes and Management in Pediatric Complex Cranial Vault Reconstruction: A Multicenter Study from the Pediatric Craniofacial Collaborative Group
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (P.A.S.); Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (S.M.G., P.M.M.); Department of Anesthesiology, The Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (F.P.C.); Departments of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine and Pediatrics, Seattle Children’s Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, D.C. (C.M.H.); Children’s National Health System, Division of Anesthesiology, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC (S.K.R.); Department of Anesthesiology, Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (T.T.N.); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (L.C., M.P.); and Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Children’s Medical Center Dallas, Texas and Outcome Research Consortium, Cleveland, Ohio (P.S.).
  • Submitted for publication June 26, 2016. Accepted for publication November 7, 2016.
    Submitted for publication June 26, 2016. Accepted for publication November 7, 2016.×
  • *Members of the Pediatric Craniofacial Collaborative Group are listed in appendix 2.
    Members of the Pediatric Craniofacial Collaborative Group are listed in appendix 2.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Stricker: Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. strickerp@email.chop.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Perioperative Medicine / Clinical Science / Coagulation and Transfusion / Pediatric Anesthesia
Perioperative Medicine   |   February 2017
Perioperative Outcomes and Management in Pediatric Complex Cranial Vault Reconstruction: A Multicenter Study from the Pediatric Craniofacial Collaborative Group
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 276-287. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001481
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 276-287. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001481
Abstract

Background: The Pediatric Craniofacial Collaborative Group established the Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery Perioperative Registry to elucidate practices and outcomes in children with craniosynostosis undergoing complex cranial vault reconstruction and inform quality improvement efforts. The aim of this study is to determine perioperative management, outcomes, and complications in children undergoing complex cranial vault reconstruction across North America and to delineate salient features of current practices.

Methods: Thirty-one institutions contributed data from June 2012 to September 2015. Data extracted included demographics, perioperative management, length of stay, laboratory results, and blood management techniques employed. Complications and outlier events were described. Outcomes analyzed included total blood donor exposures, intraoperative and perioperative transfusion volumes, and length of stay outcomes.

Results: One thousand two hundred twenty-three cases were analyzed: 935 children aged less than or equal to 24 months and 288 children aged more than 24 months. Ninety-five percent of children aged less than or equal to 24 months and 79% of children aged more than 24 months received at least one transfusion. There were no deaths. Notable complications included cardiac arrest, postoperative seizures, unplanned postoperative mechanical ventilation, large-volume transfusion, and unplanned second surgeries. Utilization of blood conservation techniques was highly variable.

Conclusions: The authors present a comprehensive description of perioperative management, outcomes, and complications from a large group of North American children undergoing complex cranial vault reconstruction. Transfusion remains the rule for the vast majority of patients. The occurrence of numerous significant complications together with large variability in perioperative management and outcomes suggest targets for improvement.