Editorial Views  |   February 2017
Isolated Forearm Test: Replicated, Relevant, and Unexplained
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York (K.O.P.); and Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (R.A.V.).
  • Accepted for publication November 8, 2016.
    Accepted for publication November 8, 2016.×
  • Corresponding article on page 214.
    Corresponding article on page 214.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Pryor: kap9009@med.cornell.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems
Editorial Views   |   February 2017
Isolated Forearm Test: Replicated, Relevant, and Unexplained
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 202-204. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001480
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 202-204. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001480
IT is a natural human tendency to internally construct the world around us largely as we learned to see it while growing up, just as it is our tendency to prefer simplified, intuitive constructs over ambiguous complexity. As anesthesiologists, we largely learned the binary concept that patients were either awake or asleep. Asleep was good, and awake was not so good. This elegant simplicity was both convenient and reassuring and enabled us to summarize the mysteries of anesthesia to patients without delving into the language and nuances of cognitive neuroscience. What our patients heard, and what we mostly intended them to hear, was that they would be asleep. Completely. Every time.
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