Editorial Views  |   February 2017
Renal Oxygen Flux during Cardiopulmonary Bypass; Tubular Damage to Preserve Glomerular Filtration—What’s a Kidney to Do?
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.
  • Corresponding article on page 205.
    Corresponding article on page 205.×
  • Accepted for publication September 22, 2016.
    Accepted for publication September 22, 2016.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Billings: frederic.t.billings@vanderbilt.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Renal and Urinary Systems / Electrolyte Balance
Editorial Views   |   February 2017
Renal Oxygen Flux during Cardiopulmonary Bypass; Tubular Damage to Preserve Glomerular Filtration—What’s a Kidney to Do?
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 199-201. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001462
Anesthesiology 2 2017, Vol.126, 199-201. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001462
ONE quarter of cardiac surgery patients continue to suffer from postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) despite the advances in perioperative patient management that have reduced mortality and shortened the duration of hospitalization. The majority of these cardiac surgery patients receive cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during surgery. CPB fundamentally alters systemic perfusion by providing nonpulsatile blood flow, induces myocardial and pulmonary ischemia, and elicits a significant neurohormonal and inflammatory response. Despite these severe physiologic derangements, the specific effects of CPB on individual and collective organ function remain unclear. In fact, the severity of major organ injury after surgical coronary revascularization appears to be similar in patients randomly assigned to on- or off-pump surgery.1  It is within this context that Lannemyr et al.2  now provide evidence that renal oxygenation is altered during and after CPB, perhaps providing a partial explanation of how CPB contributes to kidney injury.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large