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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   December 2016
Courville, Aoyagi, and ASA: 1936 Was a Banner Year!
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   December 2016
Courville, Aoyagi, and ASA: 1936 Was a Banner Year!
Anesthesiology 12 2016, Vol.125, 1218. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001427
Anesthesiology 12 2016, Vol.125, 1218. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001427
For those who favor adequately oxygenating their anesthetized patients, 1936 was indeed a banner year. That was the year when neuropathologist Cyril Courville, M.D. (1900 to 1968, top left), published his landmark paper in the journal Medicine titled, “Asphyxia as a Consequence of Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia.” That same year, a future biomedical engineer and pioneer of pulse oximetry, Takuo Aoyagi (top right), was born in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. And finally, also in 1936, the New York Society of Anesthetists nationalized into the American Society of Anesthetists (ASA). Fifty years following that name change, the ASA (now rebranded “Anesthesiologists” and with its seal colorized, bottom center) would publish its “Standards for Basic Intra-operative Monitoring” with “pulse oximetry…encouraged.” Today, 80 years after the banner year of 1936, the ASA Charitable Foundation supports the Lifebox initiative to supply pulse oximeters worldwide for safer anesthesia in “under-resourced countries.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
For those who favor adequately oxygenating their anesthetized patients, 1936 was indeed a banner year. That was the year when neuropathologist Cyril Courville, M.D. (1900 to 1968, top left), published his landmark paper in the journal Medicine titled, “Asphyxia as a Consequence of Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia.” That same year, a future biomedical engineer and pioneer of pulse oximetry, Takuo Aoyagi (top right), was born in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. And finally, also in 1936, the New York Society of Anesthetists nationalized into the American Society of Anesthetists (ASA). Fifty years following that name change, the ASA (now rebranded “Anesthesiologists” and with its seal colorized, bottom center) would publish its “Standards for Basic Intra-operative Monitoring” with “pulse oximetry…encouraged.” Today, 80 years after the banner year of 1936, the ASA Charitable Foundation supports the Lifebox initiative to supply pulse oximeters worldwide for safer anesthesia in “under-resourced countries.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
For those who favor adequately oxygenating their anesthetized patients, 1936 was indeed a banner year. That was the year when neuropathologist Cyril Courville, M.D. (1900 to 1968, top left), published his landmark paper in the journal Medicine titled, “Asphyxia as a Consequence of Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia.” That same year, a future biomedical engineer and pioneer of pulse oximetry, Takuo Aoyagi (top right), was born in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. And finally, also in 1936, the New York Society of Anesthetists nationalized into the American Society of Anesthetists (ASA). Fifty years following that name change, the ASA (now rebranded “Anesthesiologists” and with its seal colorized, bottom center) would publish its “Standards for Basic Intra-operative Monitoring” with “pulse oximetry…encouraged.” Today, 80 years after the banner year of 1936, the ASA Charitable Foundation supports the Lifebox initiative to supply pulse oximeters worldwide for safer anesthesia in “under-resourced countries.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
For those who favor adequately oxygenating their anesthetized patients, 1936 was indeed a banner year. That was the year when neuropathologist Cyril Courville, M.D. (1900 to 1968, top left), published his landmark paper in the journal Medicine titled, “Asphyxia as a Consequence of Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia.” That same year, a future biomedical engineer and pioneer of pulse oximetry, Takuo Aoyagi (top right), was born in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. And finally, also in 1936, the New York Society of Anesthetists nationalized into the American Society of Anesthetists (ASA). Fifty years following that name change, the ASA (now rebranded “Anesthesiologists” and with its seal colorized, bottom center) would publish its “Standards for Basic Intra-operative Monitoring” with “pulse oximetry…encouraged.” Today, 80 years after the banner year of 1936, the ASA Charitable Foundation supports the Lifebox initiative to supply pulse oximeters worldwide for safer anesthesia in “under-resourced countries.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
For those who favor adequately oxygenating their anesthetized patients, 1936 was indeed a banner year. That was the year when neuropathologist Cyril Courville, M.D. (1900 to 1968, top left), published his landmark paper in the journal Medicine titled, “Asphyxia as a Consequence of Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia.” That same year, a future biomedical engineer and pioneer of pulse oximetry, Takuo Aoyagi (top right), was born in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. And finally, also in 1936, the New York Society of Anesthetists nationalized into the American Society of Anesthetists (ASA). Fifty years following that name change, the ASA (now rebranded “Anesthesiologists” and with its seal colorized, bottom center) would publish its “Standards for Basic Intra-operative Monitoring” with “pulse oximetry…encouraged.” Today, 80 years after the banner year of 1936, the ASA Charitable Foundation supports the Lifebox initiative to supply pulse oximeters worldwide for safer anesthesia in “under-resourced countries.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
For those who favor adequately oxygenating their anesthetized patients, 1936 was indeed a banner year. That was the year when neuropathologist Cyril Courville, M.D. (1900 to 1968, top left), published his landmark paper in the journal Medicine titled, “Asphyxia as a Consequence of Nitrous Oxide Anesthesia.” That same year, a future biomedical engineer and pioneer of pulse oximetry, Takuo Aoyagi (top right), was born in Niigata Prefecture, Japan. And finally, also in 1936, the New York Society of Anesthetists nationalized into the American Society of Anesthetists (ASA). Fifty years following that name change, the ASA (now rebranded “Anesthesiologists” and with its seal colorized, bottom center) would publish its “Standards for Basic Intra-operative Monitoring” with “pulse oximetry…encouraged.” Today, 80 years after the banner year of 1936, the ASA Charitable Foundation supports the Lifebox initiative to supply pulse oximeters worldwide for safer anesthesia in “under-resourced countries.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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