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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   December 2016
Moynihan Syringe for Quinine and Urea Local Anesthesia
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   December 2016
Moynihan Syringe for Quinine and Urea Local Anesthesia
Anesthesiology 12 2016, Vol.125, 1170. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001424
Anesthesiology 12 2016, Vol.125, 1170. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001424
In his 1914 masterwork Anoci-Association, Cleveland surgeon George W. Crile, M.D. (1864 to 1943), depicted (top) the “Moynihan Syringe for the Infiltration of Quinin[e] and Urea Hydrochlorid[e].” His book was published seven years after the first publication about long-lasting local anesthesia and analgesia following injection of a mixture of quinine with urea. Manufactured by Eli Lilly & Company of Indianapolis, the glass tube (bottom) contained “20 soluble hypodermic tablets” with 2 grains or 0.13 grams of Quinine-Urea mixture. Although it was a long-acting local anesthetic and analgesic, the quinine-urea mixture could delay wound healing if directly injected into wound edges. And that is why Dr. Crile recommended use of a syringe with a long offset needle such as Moynihan’s for infiltrating “at a Distance from the Incision.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In his 1914 masterwork Anoci-Association, Cleveland surgeon George W. Crile, M.D. (1864 to 1943), depicted (top) the “Moynihan Syringe for the Infiltration of Quinin[e] and Urea Hydrochlorid[e].” His book was published seven years after the first publication about long-lasting local anesthesia and analgesia following injection of a mixture of quinine with urea. Manufactured by Eli Lilly & Company of Indianapolis, the glass tube (bottom) contained “20 soluble hypodermic tablets” with 2 grains or 0.13 grams of Quinine-Urea mixture. Although it was a long-acting local anesthetic and analgesic, the quinine-urea mixture could delay wound healing if directly injected into wound edges. And that is why Dr. Crile recommended use of a syringe with a long offset needle such as Moynihan’s for infiltrating “at a Distance from the Incision.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In his 1914 masterwork Anoci-Association, Cleveland surgeon George W. Crile, M.D. (1864 to 1943), depicted (top) the “Moynihan Syringe for the Infiltration of Quinin[e] and Urea Hydrochlorid[e].” His book was published seven years after the first publication about long-lasting local anesthesia and analgesia following injection of a mixture of quinine with urea. Manufactured by Eli Lilly & Company of Indianapolis, the glass tube (bottom) contained “20 soluble hypodermic tablets” with 2 grains or 0.13 grams of Quinine-Urea mixture. Although it was a long-acting local anesthetic and analgesic, the quinine-urea mixture could delay wound healing if directly injected into wound edges. And that is why Dr. Crile recommended use of a syringe with a long offset needle such as Moynihan’s for infiltrating “at a Distance from the Incision.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
In his 1914 masterwork Anoci-Association, Cleveland surgeon George W. Crile, M.D. (1864 to 1943), depicted (top) the “Moynihan Syringe for the Infiltration of Quinin[e] and Urea Hydrochlorid[e].” His book was published seven years after the first publication about long-lasting local anesthesia and analgesia following injection of a mixture of quinine with urea. Manufactured by Eli Lilly & Company of Indianapolis, the glass tube (bottom) contained “20 soluble hypodermic tablets” with 2 grains or 0.13 grams of Quinine-Urea mixture. Although it was a long-acting local anesthetic and analgesic, the quinine-urea mixture could delay wound healing if directly injected into wound edges. And that is why Dr. Crile recommended use of a syringe with a long offset needle such as Moynihan’s for infiltrating “at a Distance from the Incision.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In his 1914 masterwork Anoci-Association, Cleveland surgeon George W. Crile, M.D. (1864 to 1943), depicted (top) the “Moynihan Syringe for the Infiltration of Quinin[e] and Urea Hydrochlorid[e].” His book was published seven years after the first publication about long-lasting local anesthesia and analgesia following injection of a mixture of quinine with urea. Manufactured by Eli Lilly & Company of Indianapolis, the glass tube (bottom) contained “20 soluble hypodermic tablets” with 2 grains or 0.13 grams of Quinine-Urea mixture. Although it was a long-acting local anesthetic and analgesic, the quinine-urea mixture could delay wound healing if directly injected into wound edges. And that is why Dr. Crile recommended use of a syringe with a long offset needle such as Moynihan’s for infiltrating “at a Distance from the Incision.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
In his 1914 masterwork Anoci-Association, Cleveland surgeon George W. Crile, M.D. (1864 to 1943), depicted (top) the “Moynihan Syringe for the Infiltration of Quinin[e] and Urea Hydrochlorid[e].” His book was published seven years after the first publication about long-lasting local anesthesia and analgesia following injection of a mixture of quinine with urea. Manufactured by Eli Lilly & Company of Indianapolis, the glass tube (bottom) contained “20 soluble hypodermic tablets” with 2 grains or 0.13 grams of Quinine-Urea mixture. Although it was a long-acting local anesthetic and analgesic, the quinine-urea mixture could delay wound healing if directly injected into wound edges. And that is why Dr. Crile recommended use of a syringe with a long offset needle such as Moynihan’s for infiltrating “at a Distance from the Incision.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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