Classic Papers Revisited  |   March 2017
Intraabdominal Surgery and Anesthesia Management
Author Notes
  • From the David S. Sheridan Professorship in Anaesthesia and Respiratory Therapy, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Supplemental Digital Content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are available in both the HTML and PDF versions of this article. Links to the digital files are provided in the HTML text of this article on the Journal’s Web site (www.anesthesiology.org).
    Supplemental Digital Content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are available in both the HTML and PDF versions of this article. Links to the digital files are provided in the HTML text of this article on the Journal’s Web site (www.anesthesiology.org).×
  • Submitted for publication October 4, 2016. Accepted for publication October 5, 2016.
    Submitted for publication October 4, 2016. Accepted for publication October 5, 2016.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Hedley-Whyte: David S. Sheridan Professorship in Anaesthesia and Respiratory Therapy, Harvard University, 1400 VFW Parkway, Boston, Massachusetts 02132. john_hedley-whyte@hms.harvard.edu. Information on purchasing reprints may be found at www.anesthesiology.org or on the masthead page at the beginning of this issue. Anesthesiology’s articles are made freely accessible to all readers, for personal use only, 6 months from the cover date of the issue.
Article Information
Classic Papers Revisited / Respiratory System
Classic Papers Revisited   |   March 2017
Intraabdominal Surgery and Anesthesia Management
Anesthesiology 3 2017, Vol.126, 543-546. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001413
Anesthesiology 3 2017, Vol.126, 543-546. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001413
Abstract

Inspired Oxygenation in Surgical Patients During General Anesthesia With Controlled Ventilation: A Concept of Atelectasis. By Bendixen HH, Hedley-Whyte J, and Laver MB. New Engl J Med 1963; 269:991–996. Reprinted with permission.

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine if the pattern of ventilation, by itself, influences oxygenation during anesthesia and surgery and examine the hypothesis that progressive pulmonary atelectasis may occur during constant ventilation whenever periodic hyperventilation is lacking, but is reversible by passive hyperinflation of the lungs. Eighteen surgical patients, ranging in age from 24 to 87 yr, without known pulmonary disease, were studied during intraabdominal procedures and one radical mastectomy. Although ventilation remained constant, changes occurred in arterial oxygen tension and in total pulmonary compliance, with an average fall of 22% in oxygen tension and 15% in total pulmonary compliance. This fall in oxygen tension supports the hypothesis that progressive mechanical atelectasis may lead to increased venous admixture to arterial blood. The influence of the ventilator pattern on atelectasis and shunting is further illustrated by the reversibility of the fall in oxygen tension that follows hyperinflation. A relation between the degree of ventilation and the magnitude of fall in arterial oxygen tension was found, where large tidal volumes appear to protect against falls in oxygen tension, while shallow tidal volumes lead to atelectasis and increased shunting with impaired oxygenation.