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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   November 2016
Franklin College, Oldest Building at the University of Georgia and Dormitory to Crawford Long and Alexander Stephens
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   November 2016
Franklin College, Oldest Building at the University of Georgia and Dormitory to Crawford Long and Alexander Stephens
Anesthesiology 11 2016, Vol.125, 860. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001394
Anesthesiology 11 2016, Vol.125, 860. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001394
Originally named after Benjamin Franklin, today’s University of Georgia was once known formally as Franklin College and informally as “Old College” (right). Its two most famous roommates to “dorm” in this brick structure (left) were natives of Georgia, Crawford W. Long (1815 to 1878) and Alexander H. Stephens (1812 to 1883). Each of the roommates joined a college literary society: Long, the Demosthenian; Stephens, Phi Kappa. A tiny, sickly man, Stephens graduated first in his class in 1832. He would study law, pass the bar, and serve as vice president of the Confederacy and finally governor of Georgia. A sturdier physical specimen than Stephens, Long earned his A.M. degree in 1835 and survived a horseback ride through Cherokee Territory to his initial medical school in Kentucky. After completing his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, Long returned to Georgia to practice medicine. His most famous moment was etherizing James Venable in 1842 for minor surgery. Long died in 1878; Stephens, in 1883. Statues of these two Georgians were donated by their home state to the federal government in 1926 (Long) and 1927 (Stephens). These onetime college roommates were finally reunited, at least in Georgia marble, in Congress’ National Statuary Hall! (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Originally named after Benjamin Franklin, today’s University of Georgia was once known formally as Franklin College and informally as “Old College” (right). Its two most famous roommates to “dorm” in this brick structure (left) were natives of Georgia, Crawford W. Long (1815 to 1878) and Alexander H. Stephens (1812 to 1883). Each of the roommates joined a college literary society: Long, the Demosthenian; Stephens, Phi Kappa. A tiny, sickly man, Stephens graduated first in his class in 1832. He would study law, pass the bar, and serve as vice president of the Confederacy and finally governor of Georgia. A sturdier physical specimen than Stephens, Long earned his A.M. degree in 1835 and survived a horseback ride through Cherokee Territory to his initial medical school in Kentucky. After completing his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, Long returned to Georgia to practice medicine. His most famous moment was etherizing James Venable in 1842 for minor surgery. Long died in 1878; Stephens, in 1883. Statues of these two Georgians were donated by their home state to the federal government in 1926 (Long) and 1927 (Stephens). These onetime college roommates were finally reunited, at least in Georgia marble, in Congress’ National Statuary Hall! (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Originally named after Benjamin Franklin, today’s University of Georgia was once known formally as Franklin College and informally as “Old College” (right). Its two most famous roommates to “dorm” in this brick structure (left) were natives of Georgia, Crawford W. Long (1815 to 1878) and Alexander H. Stephens (1812 to 1883). Each of the roommates joined a college literary society: Long, the Demosthenian; Stephens, Phi Kappa. A tiny, sickly man, Stephens graduated first in his class in 1832. He would study law, pass the bar, and serve as vice president of the Confederacy and finally governor of Georgia. A sturdier physical specimen than Stephens, Long earned his A.M. degree in 1835 and survived a horseback ride through Cherokee Territory to his initial medical school in Kentucky. After completing his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, Long returned to Georgia to practice medicine. His most famous moment was etherizing James Venable in 1842 for minor surgery. Long died in 1878; Stephens, in 1883. Statues of these two Georgians were donated by their home state to the federal government in 1926 (Long) and 1927 (Stephens). These onetime college roommates were finally reunited, at least in Georgia marble, in Congress’ National Statuary Hall! (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Originally named after Benjamin Franklin, today’s University of Georgia was once known formally as Franklin College and informally as “Old College” (right). Its two most famous roommates to “dorm” in this brick structure (left) were natives of Georgia, Crawford W. Long (1815 to 1878) and Alexander H. Stephens (1812 to 1883). Each of the roommates joined a college literary society: Long, the Demosthenian; Stephens, Phi Kappa. A tiny, sickly man, Stephens graduated first in his class in 1832. He would study law, pass the bar, and serve as vice president of the Confederacy and finally governor of Georgia. A sturdier physical specimen than Stephens, Long earned his A.M. degree in 1835 and survived a horseback ride through Cherokee Territory to his initial medical school in Kentucky. After completing his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, Long returned to Georgia to practice medicine. His most famous moment was etherizing James Venable in 1842 for minor surgery. Long died in 1878; Stephens, in 1883. Statues of these two Georgians were donated by their home state to the federal government in 1926 (Long) and 1927 (Stephens). These onetime college roommates were finally reunited, at least in Georgia marble, in Congress’ National Statuary Hall! (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Originally named after Benjamin Franklin, today’s University of Georgia was once known formally as Franklin College and informally as “Old College” (right). Its two most famous roommates to “dorm” in this brick structure (left) were natives of Georgia, Crawford W. Long (1815 to 1878) and Alexander H. Stephens (1812 to 1883). Each of the roommates joined a college literary society: Long, the Demosthenian; Stephens, Phi Kappa. A tiny, sickly man, Stephens graduated first in his class in 1832. He would study law, pass the bar, and serve as vice president of the Confederacy and finally governor of Georgia. A sturdier physical specimen than Stephens, Long earned his A.M. degree in 1835 and survived a horseback ride through Cherokee Territory to his initial medical school in Kentucky. After completing his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, Long returned to Georgia to practice medicine. His most famous moment was etherizing James Venable in 1842 for minor surgery. Long died in 1878; Stephens, in 1883. Statues of these two Georgians were donated by their home state to the federal government in 1926 (Long) and 1927 (Stephens). These onetime college roommates were finally reunited, at least in Georgia marble, in Congress’ National Statuary Hall! (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
Originally named after Benjamin Franklin, today’s University of Georgia was once known formally as Franklin College and informally as “Old College” (right). Its two most famous roommates to “dorm” in this brick structure (left) were natives of Georgia, Crawford W. Long (1815 to 1878) and Alexander H. Stephens (1812 to 1883). Each of the roommates joined a college literary society: Long, the Demosthenian; Stephens, Phi Kappa. A tiny, sickly man, Stephens graduated first in his class in 1832. He would study law, pass the bar, and serve as vice president of the Confederacy and finally governor of Georgia. A sturdier physical specimen than Stephens, Long earned his A.M. degree in 1835 and survived a horseback ride through Cherokee Territory to his initial medical school in Kentucky. After completing his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, Long returned to Georgia to practice medicine. His most famous moment was etherizing James Venable in 1842 for minor surgery. Long died in 1878; Stephens, in 1883. Statues of these two Georgians were donated by their home state to the federal government in 1926 (Long) and 1927 (Stephens). These onetime college roommates were finally reunited, at least in Georgia marble, in Congress’ National Statuary Hall! (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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