Editorial Views  |   January 2017
Monkey in the Middle: Translational Studies of Pediatric Anesthetic Exposure
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Neuroscience and Friedman Brain Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (M.G.B.); and Division of Developmental and Cognitive Neuroscience, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Atlanta, Georgia (M.C.A.).
  • Corresponding article on page 74.
    Corresponding article on page 74.×
  • Accepted for publication September 6, 2016.
    Accepted for publication September 6, 2016.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Baxter: mark.baxter@mssm.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Pediatric Anesthesia
Editorial Views   |   January 2017
Monkey in the Middle: Translational Studies of Pediatric Anesthetic Exposure
Anesthesiology 1 2017, Vol.126, 6-8. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001384
Anesthesiology 1 2017, Vol.126, 6-8. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001384
A SEMINAL report by Jevtovic-Todorovic et al.1  described neurotoxicity and long-term cognitive impairments after exposure to general anesthesia in infant (postnatal day 7) rats. This phenomenon has been observed repeatedly in multiple species and with a variety of different anesthetic drugs. It has also sparked parallel retrospective and prospective studies in humans that suggest that pediatric anesthesia might be associated with increased risk of adverse neurocognitive outcomes when exposure is repeated or prolonged.2–9  The recent investigation by Coleman et al.10  joins a growing number of studies investigating the impact of exposure to general anesthesia in infancy on neurobehavioral development in nonhuman primates. This highly translationally relevant model makes unique contributions to understanding the phenomena and potential mechanisms of long-term cognitive and behavioral changes after general anesthesia early in life.
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