Correspondence  |   October 2016
In Reply
Author Notes
  • Dalian Municipal Friendship Hospital, Dalian, Liaoning, China. han651310@163.com
  • (Accepted for publication June 23, 2016.)
    (Accepted for publication June 23, 2016.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   October 2016
In Reply
Anesthesiology 10 2016, Vol.125, 822-823. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001258
Anesthesiology 10 2016, Vol.125, 822-823. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001258
We thank Dr. Riegelhaupt and colleagues for their thoughtful comments on our article.1  We stated that our concentrations (10 to 100 μM) of propofol are “clinically relevant,” because the total concentration of propofol in the blood of anesthetized humans is typically in the range of approximately 10 to 40 μM. Dr. Riegelhaupt and colleagues correctly point out that “free” propofol concentration in blood of anesthetized humans is estimated to be lower (approximately 0.4 μM),2  because more than 97% of total propofol is bound to blood constituents, such as albumin, and thus is pharmacologically sequestered.3  They expressed concerns that our statement of clinical relevance is misleading.
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