Correspondence  |   October 2016
Can Sonography of the Inferior Vena Cava Predict More than Just Intraoperative Hypotension?
Author Notes
  • Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (H.J.S.). harm.scholten@cze.nl
  • This letter was sent to the author of the original article referenced above, who declined to respond.—Evan D. Kharasch, M.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief.
    This letter was sent to the author of the original article referenced above, who declined to respond.—Evan D. Kharasch, M.D., Ph.D., Editor-in-Chief.×
  • (Accepted for publication June 7, 2016.)
    (Accepted for publication June 7, 2016.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   October 2016
Can Sonography of the Inferior Vena Cava Predict More than Just Intraoperative Hypotension?
Anesthesiology 10 2016, Vol.125, 812-813. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001224
Anesthesiology 10 2016, Vol.125, 812-813. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001224
With interest we read the article by Zhang and Critchley1  and sincerely commend them for their effort to further expand the role of ultrasound in the perioperative setting. They find an association between a greater respiratory variation in the diameter of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and the collapsibility index (IVCCI), suggestive of low volume status and the occurrence of hypotension after induction of anesthesia. Clearly, this offers the anesthesiologist another tool to identify patients at potential risk for adverse outcomes during anesthesia. However, a few issues may warrant some consideration before extrapolation of the present results to clinical practice, as the question on the preferred treatment of these patients (e.g., fluid administration) in our opinion still remains.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large