Editorial Views  |   November 2016
Better Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit: Blue Pill or Red Pill… or No Pill?
Author Notes
  • From the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.
  • Corresponding article on page 979.
    Corresponding article on page 979.×
  • Accepted for publication July 28, 2016.
    Accepted for publication July 28, 2016.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Owens: rowens@ucsd.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems / Critical Care
Editorial Views   |   November 2016
Better Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit: Blue Pill or Red Pill… or No Pill?
Anesthesiology 11 2016, Vol.125, 835-837. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001326
Anesthesiology 11 2016, Vol.125, 835-837. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001326
SLEEP is hard to come by in the intensive care unit (ICU). When quantified, Elliott et al.1  found that sleep duration was curtailed (mean, 5 h per night) and very fragmented, with a median duration of sleep before waking of just 3 min! Illness may impact sleep, but it is likely that the ICU environment (e.g., noise and light) and customary practices (e.g., lab draws and x-rays for morning rounds) also greatly contribute to the lack of consolidated sleep. Although changing the ICU culture to promote sleep is difficult,2  attention to sleep has been associated with improved clinical outcomes, specifically a reduction in the major outcome of ICU delirium.3,4 
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large