Correspondence  |   September 2016
In Reply
Author Notes
  • University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. beverley.orser@utoronto.ca
  • (Accepted for publication April 28, 2016.)
    (Accepted for publication April 28, 2016.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   September 2016
In Reply
Anesthesiology 9 2016, Vol.125, 604-605. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001206
Anesthesiology 9 2016, Vol.125, 604-605. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001206
We thank Dr. Laudanski for his thoughtful comments and questions. Our study1  was motivated by the need to understand why critically ill patients, such as those in high inflammatory states (e.g., due to sepsis, trauma, burns, autoimmune disease), are often more sensitive to general anesthetic drugs than are healthier patients. Identifying the factors that cause a standard dose of anesthetic to produce deeper levels of sedation in sicker patients is fundamentally important because of the risks associated with a relative drug overdose.2  Indeed, excessively deep anesthesia may increase postoperative mortality.3–5 
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