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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   September 2016
From Chloroform to Terpsichore, Liebig’s Muse of Dance
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   September 2016
From Chloroform to Terpsichore, Liebig’s Muse of Dance
Anesthesiology 9 2016, Vol.125, 494. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001288
Anesthesiology 9 2016, Vol.125, 494. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001288
If Polyhymnia reigned as Muse of Hymns and Sacred Dance, then Terpsichore (“delight in the chorus or dance”) governed more secular choreography as the Muse of Dance and Choral Song. Indeed, Terpsichore inspired the Greek chorus so dear to ancient playwrights. Next to her iconic lyre, Terpsichore (above) is depicted prancing along the shore on this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873). Today, our English word “terpsichorean” is synonymous with “dancer” or “of dancing.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
If Polyhymnia reigned as Muse of Hymns and Sacred Dance, then Terpsichore (“delight in the chorus or dance”) governed more secular choreography as the Muse of Dance and Choral Song. Indeed, Terpsichore inspired the Greek chorus so dear to ancient playwrights. Next to her iconic lyre, Terpsichore (above) is depicted prancing along the shore on this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873). Today, our English word “terpsichorean” is synonymous with “dancer” or “of dancing.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
If Polyhymnia reigned as Muse of Hymns and Sacred Dance, then Terpsichore (“delight in the chorus or dance”) governed more secular choreography as the Muse of Dance and Choral Song. Indeed, Terpsichore inspired the Greek chorus so dear to ancient playwrights. Next to her iconic lyre, Terpsichore (above) is depicted prancing along the shore on this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873). Today, our English word “terpsichorean” is synonymous with “dancer” or “of dancing.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
If Polyhymnia reigned as Muse of Hymns and Sacred Dance, then Terpsichore (“delight in the chorus or dance”) governed more secular choreography as the Muse of Dance and Choral Song. Indeed, Terpsichore inspired the Greek chorus so dear to ancient playwrights. Next to her iconic lyre, Terpsichore (above) is depicted prancing along the shore on this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873). Today, our English word “terpsichorean” is synonymous with “dancer” or “of dancing.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
If Polyhymnia reigned as Muse of Hymns and Sacred Dance, then Terpsichore (“delight in the chorus or dance”) governed more secular choreography as the Muse of Dance and Choral Song. Indeed, Terpsichore inspired the Greek chorus so dear to ancient playwrights. Next to her iconic lyre, Terpsichore (above) is depicted prancing along the shore on this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873). Today, our English word “terpsichorean” is synonymous with “dancer” or “of dancing.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
If Polyhymnia reigned as Muse of Hymns and Sacred Dance, then Terpsichore (“delight in the chorus or dance”) governed more secular choreography as the Muse of Dance and Choral Song. Indeed, Terpsichore inspired the Greek chorus so dear to ancient playwrights. Next to her iconic lyre, Terpsichore (above) is depicted prancing along the shore on this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873). Today, our English word “terpsichorean” is synonymous with “dancer” or “of dancing.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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