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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   September 2016
From Chloroform to Clio and Calliope, Liebig’s Muses of History and Epic Poetry
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   September 2016
From Chloroform to Clio and Calliope, Liebig’s Muses of History and Epic Poetry
Anesthesiology 9 2016, Vol.125, 453. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001286
Anesthesiology 9 2016, Vol.125, 453. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001286
On this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873), a seated Muse Clio (right) records history upon a writing tablet with her stylus. As the Muse of History, Clio governs historical collections, such as the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. However, in ancient Greece, long chronicles of names and events were frequently mastered in the semimusical oral tradition of ancient Greek verse. Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey invoked a goddess, perhaps the Muse of Epic Poetry, Calliope (“beautiful voiced”). She is frequently depicted as a belaureled standing figure (left) clutching her iconic scroll. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
On this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873), a seated Muse Clio (right) records history upon a writing tablet with her stylus. As the Muse of History, Clio governs historical collections, such as the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. However, in ancient Greece, long chronicles of names and events were frequently mastered in the semimusical oral tradition of ancient Greek verse. Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey invoked a goddess, perhaps the Muse of Epic Poetry, Calliope (“beautiful voiced”). She is frequently depicted as a belaureled standing figure (left) clutching her iconic scroll. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
On this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873), a seated Muse Clio (right) records history upon a writing tablet with her stylus. As the Muse of History, Clio governs historical collections, such as the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. However, in ancient Greece, long chronicles of names and events were frequently mastered in the semimusical oral tradition of ancient Greek verse. Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey invoked a goddess, perhaps the Muse of Epic Poetry, Calliope (“beautiful voiced”). She is frequently depicted as a belaureled standing figure (left) clutching her iconic scroll. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
On this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873), a seated Muse Clio (right) records history upon a writing tablet with her stylus. As the Muse of History, Clio governs historical collections, such as the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. However, in ancient Greece, long chronicles of names and events were frequently mastered in the semimusical oral tradition of ancient Greek verse. Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey invoked a goddess, perhaps the Muse of Epic Poetry, Calliope (“beautiful voiced”). She is frequently depicted as a belaureled standing figure (left) clutching her iconic scroll. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
On this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873), a seated Muse Clio (right) records history upon a writing tablet with her stylus. As the Muse of History, Clio governs historical collections, such as the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. However, in ancient Greece, long chronicles of names and events were frequently mastered in the semimusical oral tradition of ancient Greek verse. Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey invoked a goddess, perhaps the Muse of Epic Poetry, Calliope (“beautiful voiced”). She is frequently depicted as a belaureled standing figure (left) clutching her iconic scroll. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
On this Italian card advertising a company named after chloroform pioneer Justus von Liebig (1803 to 1873), a seated Muse Clio (right) records history upon a writing tablet with her stylus. As the Muse of History, Clio governs historical collections, such as the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. However, in ancient Greece, long chronicles of names and events were frequently mastered in the semimusical oral tradition of ancient Greek verse. Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey invoked a goddess, perhaps the Muse of Epic Poetry, Calliope (“beautiful voiced”). She is frequently depicted as a belaureled standing figure (left) clutching her iconic scroll. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology.)
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