Editorial Views  |   October 2016
Anesthesiologists and Healthcare Redesign: Time to Team Up with Experts
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts ( J.P.R.); and Department of Anesthesiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (W.S.S.).
  • Accepted for publication June 28, 2016.
    Accepted for publication June 28, 2016.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Rathmell: jrathmell@bwh.harvard.edu
Article Information
Editorial Views / Practice Management / Quality Improvement
Editorial Views   |   October 2016
Anesthesiologists and Healthcare Redesign: Time to Team Up with Experts
Anesthesiology 10 2016, Vol.125, 618-621. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001277
Anesthesiology 10 2016, Vol.125, 618-621. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001277
THE landscape of medical practice in the United States is changing rapidly and in ways that make it difficult to predict what we will be doing tomorrow, let alone several years in the future. We are getting a clear message that the growth in the costs of health care is unsustainable and that we must move from a fee-for-service system to a more global system of payment that rewards good patient outcomes. There is no road map for navigating this new landscape. It is a tumultuous period, with new ideas and experiments of all kinds being launched continually and competing for attention. In the perioperative environment, where an enormous fraction of the expenditures in health care are concentrated, we are all under tremendous pressure to squeeze more value from the system. Value has been defined by our business colleagues up the Charles River as quality divided by cost, better patient outcomes at the same or lower cost.1  We (J.P.R. and W.S.S.), along with numerous colleagues across the country and in numerous practice settings, have led groups assembled to improve the way we deliver care.2,3  Almost 3 yr ago, Dr. Rathmell proposed that Anesthesiology host a symposium during the 2015 American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting to highlight this rapidly growing area, perioperative or periprocedural care redesign, where anesthesiologists across the country are now widely involved. We wanted to see some of the best experiments up close, and we hoped to see some hypothesis-driven science that would make its way to full-length articles in anesthesiology where others could learn from successful and carefully conducted care redesign work. What did we learn?
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