Editorial Views  |   October 2016
Avoiding Repeated Attempts at Tracheal Intubation: Can Videolaryngoscopes Be the Answer?
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Anesthesiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Minamikoshigaya, Koshigaya City, Saitama, Japan.
  • This article has been selected for the Anesthesiology CME Program. Learning objectives and disclosure and ordering information can be found in the CME section at the front of this issue.
    This article has been selected for the Anesthesiology CME Program. Learning objectives and disclosure and ordering information can be found in the CME section at the front of this issue.×
  • Corresponding article on page 656.
    Corresponding article on page 656.×
  • Accepted for publication June 28, 2016.
    Accepted for publication June 28, 2016.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Asai: asaita@dokkyomed.ac.jp
Article Information
Editorial Views / Airway Management / Technology / Equipment / Monitoring
Editorial Views   |   October 2016
Avoiding Repeated Attempts at Tracheal Intubation: Can Videolaryngoscopes Be the Answer?
Anesthesiology 10 2016, Vol.125, 615-617. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001268
Anesthesiology 10 2016, Vol.125, 615-617. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001268
REPEATED attempts at tracheal intubation increase the incidence of airway obstruction, leading to serious airway complications.1,2  Therefore, major guidelines for difficult airway management unanimously recommend avoiding repeated attempts at tracheal intubation.3–5  Much effort has been made to reduce the incidence of difficult intubation with a conventional Macintosh or Miller laryngoscope, but the incidence seems to remain the same. Technological development allows us to use alternative intubation devices, but it is not clear which device is most suitable to minimize repeated attempts at intubation. In this issue of Anesthesiology, Aziz et al.6  studied which alternative intubation devices were frequently used in patients after intubation with a conventional laryngoscope had failed and compared the successful rates of intubation with the following alternative “rescue” devices: a videolaryngoscope, a fiberoptic bronchoscope, a supraglottic airway (as a conduit for tracheal intubation), a lighted stylet, and an optical stylet.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large