Correspondence  |   August 2016
In Reply
Author Notes
  • Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (M.L.B.). michael.l.beach@hitchcock.org
  • (Accepted for publication April 20, 2016.)
    (Accepted for publication April 20, 2016.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   August 2016
In Reply
Anesthesiology 8 2016, Vol.125, 425-426. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001172
Anesthesiology 8 2016, Vol.125, 425-426. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001172
We appreciate the careful review of our article.1  We agree with the authors that other studies also support the low incidence of aspiration in pediatric sedation. While the study by Walker2  of 118,371 pediatric patients is also large, only information on the 24 cases of aspiration was collected. Our study collected data on all patients, allowing us to evaluate risk factors for aspiration using major complications. We agree that our definition of nil per os (NPO) is not based on current American Society of Anesthesiologists guidelines from 2011 because the data were collected from 2007 to 2011.
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