Correspondence  |   August 2016
Long-term Survival, All-cause Mortality, and Propensity Score Matching
Author Notes
  • Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom (U.A.). u.ali@doctors.org.uk
  • (Accepted for publication March 28, 2016.)
    (Accepted for publication March 28, 2016.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   August 2016
Long-term Survival, All-cause Mortality, and Propensity Score Matching
Anesthesiology 8 2016, Vol.125, 419-420. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001176
Anesthesiology 8 2016, Vol.125, 419-420. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001176
We read with great interest the article by Wigmore et al.1  The authors have produced one of the largest studies published looking at cancer survival and anesthesia.
In an era where new cancer therapies are becoming ever more expensive to develop, their primary study finding, increase in mortality associated with inhalational anesthesia compared to intravenous anesthesia with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.46 (1.29 to 1.69) after propensity score matching and multivariate analysis, is one of huge potential significance.
There are three points arising from the study we would like to discuss.
First, we agree with the authors that long-term survival is a key outcome measure in cancer surveillance. However, we noticed this study analyzed patients over a 3-yr period, with a further 18-month follow-up period, giving a maximum total potential follow-up time of 4.5 yr.
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