Free
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   August 2016
Great-grandson Restout’s 1771 Painting, Exhibited as Morpheus in 1783
Article Information
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   August 2016
Great-grandson Restout’s 1771 Painting, Exhibited as Morpheus in 1783
Anesthesiology 8 2016, Vol.125, 354. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001244
Anesthesiology 8 2016, Vol.125, 354. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001244
Highly popular in 18th-century France, the Metamorphoses written by Ovid of Rome characterized Morpheus as a cave-bound, winged god of dreams who was surrounded by opium poppies. Ovid’s vivid description likely influenced the 1771 painting (above), Morpheus, by Jean-Bernard Restout (1732 to 1797). As the youngster of the celebrated Restout Dynasty of French painters, Jean-Bernard flourished in the artistic tradition of his great-grandfather Marc-Antoine, grandfather Jean the Elder (1666 to 1702), and father Jean the Younger. In fact, just two years before painting Morpheus, Jean-Bernard Restout had been inducted into France’s Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture. During the French Revolution, Restout led the Commune des Arts in suppressing the Academy, the very society most responsible for cultivating Restout’s clinical attention to anatomic detail. Missing from Restout’s rendering of his god of dreams is Ovid’s description of how the shape-shifting “Morpheus … express’d the shape of man, and imitated best…. but all his action is confined, extending not beyond our humankind.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesio logists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology)
Highly popular in 18th-century France, the Metamorphoses written by Ovid of Rome characterized Morpheus as a cave-bound, winged god of dreams who was surrounded by opium poppies. Ovid’s vivid description likely influenced the 1771 painting (above), Morpheus, by Jean-Bernard Restout (1732 to 1797). As the youngster of the celebrated Restout Dynasty of French painters, Jean-Bernard flourished in the artistic tradition of his great-grandfather Marc-Antoine, grandfather Jean the Elder (1666 to 1702), and father Jean the Younger. In fact, just two years before painting Morpheus, Jean-Bernard Restout had been inducted into France’s Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture. During the French Revolution, Restout led the Commune des Arts in suppressing the Academy, the very society most responsible for cultivating Restout’s clinical attention to anatomic detail. Missing from Restout’s rendering of his god of dreams is Ovid’s description of how the shape-shifting “Morpheus … express’d the shape of man, and imitated best…. but all his action is confined, extending not beyond our humankind.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesio logists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology)
Highly popular in 18th-century France, the Metamorphoses written by Ovid of Rome characterized Morpheus as a cave-bound, winged god of dreams who was surrounded by opium poppies. Ovid’s vivid description likely influenced the 1771 painting (above), Morpheus, by Jean-Bernard Restout (1732 to 1797). As the youngster of the celebrated Restout Dynasty of French painters, Jean-Bernard flourished in the artistic tradition of his great-grandfather Marc-Antoine, grandfather Jean the Elder (1666 to 1702), and father Jean the Younger. In fact, just two years before painting Morpheus, Jean-Bernard Restout had been inducted into France’s Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture. During the French Revolution, Restout led the Commune des Arts in suppressing the Academy, the very society most responsible for cultivating Restout’s clinical attention to anatomic detail. Missing from Restout’s rendering of his god of dreams is Ovid’s description of how the shape-shifting “Morpheus … express’d the shape of man, and imitated best…. but all his action is confined, extending not beyond our humankind.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesio logists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology)
×
George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Highly popular in 18th-century France, the Metamorphoses written by Ovid of Rome characterized Morpheus as a cave-bound, winged god of dreams who was surrounded by opium poppies. Ovid’s vivid description likely influenced the 1771 painting (above), Morpheus, by Jean-Bernard Restout (1732 to 1797). As the youngster of the celebrated Restout Dynasty of French painters, Jean-Bernard flourished in the artistic tradition of his great-grandfather Marc-Antoine, grandfather Jean the Elder (1666 to 1702), and father Jean the Younger. In fact, just two years before painting Morpheus, Jean-Bernard Restout had been inducted into France’s Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture. During the French Revolution, Restout led the Commune des Arts in suppressing the Academy, the very society most responsible for cultivating Restout’s clinical attention to anatomic detail. Missing from Restout’s rendering of his god of dreams is Ovid’s description of how the shape-shifting “Morpheus … express’d the shape of man, and imitated best…. but all his action is confined, extending not beyond our humankind.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesio logists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology)
Highly popular in 18th-century France, the Metamorphoses written by Ovid of Rome characterized Morpheus as a cave-bound, winged god of dreams who was surrounded by opium poppies. Ovid’s vivid description likely influenced the 1771 painting (above), Morpheus, by Jean-Bernard Restout (1732 to 1797). As the youngster of the celebrated Restout Dynasty of French painters, Jean-Bernard flourished in the artistic tradition of his great-grandfather Marc-Antoine, grandfather Jean the Elder (1666 to 1702), and father Jean the Younger. In fact, just two years before painting Morpheus, Jean-Bernard Restout had been inducted into France’s Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture. During the French Revolution, Restout led the Commune des Arts in suppressing the Academy, the very society most responsible for cultivating Restout’s clinical attention to anatomic detail. Missing from Restout’s rendering of his god of dreams is Ovid’s description of how the shape-shifting “Morpheus … express’d the shape of man, and imitated best…. but all his action is confined, extending not beyond our humankind.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesio logists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology)
Highly popular in 18th-century France, the Metamorphoses written by Ovid of Rome characterized Morpheus as a cave-bound, winged god of dreams who was surrounded by opium poppies. Ovid’s vivid description likely influenced the 1771 painting (above), Morpheus, by Jean-Bernard Restout (1732 to 1797). As the youngster of the celebrated Restout Dynasty of French painters, Jean-Bernard flourished in the artistic tradition of his great-grandfather Marc-Antoine, grandfather Jean the Elder (1666 to 1702), and father Jean the Younger. In fact, just two years before painting Morpheus, Jean-Bernard Restout had been inducted into France’s Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture. During the French Revolution, Restout led the Commune des Arts in suppressing the Academy, the very society most responsible for cultivating Restout’s clinical attention to anatomic detail. Missing from Restout’s rendering of his god of dreams is Ovid’s description of how the shape-shifting “Morpheus … express’d the shape of man, and imitated best…. but all his action is confined, extending not beyond our humankind.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesio logists’ Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology)
×