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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   July 2016
Sanguine Temperamental Education for 1893 Classes by “Masters of Anaesthesia”
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   July 2016
Sanguine Temperamental Education for 1893 Classes by “Masters of Anaesthesia”
Anesthesiology 7 2016, Vol.125, 19. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000484137.08528.c8
Anesthesiology 7 2016, Vol.125, 19. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000484137.08528.c8
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ conversation-airing Sanguineus (1583) reminds us that a patient of sanguine temperament aired a hot, humid “blood” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental air. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a sanguine patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a stormy induction, (2) a risk for reflex heart-slowing due to anesthetic underdosage (termed “syncope” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. A world-renowned surgical pathologist, PGSA Professor Frederick Gaertner, M.D., L.L.D., M.S.A., taught that, before induction, sanguine patients might benefit from preanesthetic calming (“hypnosis”). To prevent anesthetic underdosing (or overdosing) mishaps, Dr. Gaertner stressed “the importance of the regulation … of the temperature of the vapor” and the “percentage of the narcotic … by means of a [vaporizer] dial …” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ conversation-airing Sanguineus (1583) reminds us that a patient of sanguine temperament aired a hot, humid “blood” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental air. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a sanguine patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a stormy induction, (2) a risk for reflex heart-slowing due to anesthetic underdosage (termed “syncope” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. A world-renowned surgical pathologist, PGSA Professor Frederick Gaertner, M.D., L.L.D., M.S.A., taught that, before induction, sanguine patients might benefit from preanesthetic calming (“hypnosis”). To prevent anesthetic underdosing (or overdosing) mishaps, Dr. Gaertner stressed “the importance of the regulation … of the temperature of the vapor” and the “percentage of the narcotic … by means of a [vaporizer] dial …” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ conversation-airing Sanguineus (1583) reminds us that a patient of sanguine temperament aired a hot, humid “blood” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental air. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a sanguine patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a stormy induction, (2) a risk for reflex heart-slowing due to anesthetic underdosage (termed “syncope” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. A world-renowned surgical pathologist, PGSA Professor Frederick Gaertner, M.D., L.L.D., M.S.A., taught that, before induction, sanguine patients might benefit from preanesthetic calming (“hypnosis”). To prevent anesthetic underdosing (or overdosing) mishaps, Dr. Gaertner stressed “the importance of the regulation … of the temperature of the vapor” and the “percentage of the narcotic … by means of a [vaporizer] dial …” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ conversation-airing Sanguineus (1583) reminds us that a patient of sanguine temperament aired a hot, humid “blood” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental air. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a sanguine patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a stormy induction, (2) a risk for reflex heart-slowing due to anesthetic underdosage (termed “syncope” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. A world-renowned surgical pathologist, PGSA Professor Frederick Gaertner, M.D., L.L.D., M.S.A., taught that, before induction, sanguine patients might benefit from preanesthetic calming (“hypnosis”). To prevent anesthetic underdosing (or overdosing) mishaps, Dr. Gaertner stressed “the importance of the regulation … of the temperature of the vapor” and the “percentage of the narcotic … by means of a [vaporizer] dial …” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ conversation-airing Sanguineus (1583) reminds us that a patient of sanguine temperament aired a hot, humid “blood” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental air. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a sanguine patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a stormy induction, (2) a risk for reflex heart-slowing due to anesthetic underdosage (termed “syncope” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. A world-renowned surgical pathologist, PGSA Professor Frederick Gaertner, M.D., L.L.D., M.S.A., taught that, before induction, sanguine patients might benefit from preanesthetic calming (“hypnosis”). To prevent anesthetic underdosing (or overdosing) mishaps, Dr. Gaertner stressed “the importance of the regulation … of the temperature of the vapor” and the “percentage of the narcotic … by means of a [vaporizer] dial …” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ conversation-airing Sanguineus (1583) reminds us that a patient of sanguine temperament aired a hot, humid “blood” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental air. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a sanguine patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a stormy induction, (2) a risk for reflex heart-slowing due to anesthetic underdosage (termed “syncope” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. A world-renowned surgical pathologist, PGSA Professor Frederick Gaertner, M.D., L.L.D., M.S.A., taught that, before induction, sanguine patients might benefit from preanesthetic calming (“hypnosis”). To prevent anesthetic underdosing (or overdosing) mishaps, Dr. Gaertner stressed “the importance of the regulation … of the temperature of the vapor” and the “percentage of the narcotic … by means of a [vaporizer] dial …” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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