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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   July 2016
Phlegmatic Temperamental Education for 1893 Classes by “Masters of Anaesthesia”
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   July 2016
Phlegmatic Temperamental Education for 1893 Classes by “Masters of Anaesthesia”
Anesthesiology 7 2016, Vol.125, 16. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000484136.26454.55
Anesthesiology 7 2016, Vol.125, 16. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000484136.26454.55
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ watercraft-seated Phlegmaticus (1583) reminds us that a patient of phlegmatic temperament flows with the cold, wet “phlegm” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental water. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a phlegmatic patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a smooth emergence. PGSA Professor James M. Clyde, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that phlegmatic patients might not only resist preanesthetic calming but also be vulnerable to an anesthetically “over-charged atmosphere … [which could] paralyze the medulla and cause death” from cardiac “concussion.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ watercraft-seated Phlegmaticus (1583) reminds us that a patient of phlegmatic temperament flows with the cold, wet “phlegm” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental water. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a phlegmatic patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a smooth emergence. PGSA Professor James M. Clyde, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that phlegmatic patients might not only resist preanesthetic calming but also be vulnerable to an anesthetically “over-charged atmosphere … [which could] paralyze the medulla and cause death” from cardiac “concussion.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ watercraft-seated Phlegmaticus (1583) reminds us that a patient of phlegmatic temperament flows with the cold, wet “phlegm” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental water. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a phlegmatic patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a smooth emergence. PGSA Professor James M. Clyde, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that phlegmatic patients might not only resist preanesthetic calming but also be vulnerable to an anesthetically “over-charged atmosphere … [which could] paralyze the medulla and cause death” from cardiac “concussion.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ watercraft-seated Phlegmaticus (1583) reminds us that a patient of phlegmatic temperament flows with the cold, wet “phlegm” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental water. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a phlegmatic patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a smooth emergence. PGSA Professor James M. Clyde, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that phlegmatic patients might not only resist preanesthetic calming but also be vulnerable to an anesthetically “over-charged atmosphere … [which could] paralyze the medulla and cause death” from cardiac “concussion.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ watercraft-seated Phlegmaticus (1583) reminds us that a patient of phlegmatic temperament flows with the cold, wet “phlegm” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental water. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a phlegmatic patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a smooth emergence. PGSA Professor James M. Clyde, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that phlegmatic patients might not only resist preanesthetic calming but also be vulnerable to an anesthetically “over-charged atmosphere … [which could] paralyze the medulla and cause death” from cardiac “concussion.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ watercraft-seated Phlegmaticus (1583) reminds us that a patient of phlegmatic temperament flows with the cold, wet “phlegm” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental water. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a phlegmatic patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a smooth emergence. PGSA Professor James M. Clyde, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that phlegmatic patients might not only resist preanesthetic calming but also be vulnerable to an anesthetically “over-charged atmosphere … [which could] paralyze the medulla and cause death” from cardiac “concussion.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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