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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   July 2016
Choleric Temperamental Education for 1893 Classes by “Masters of Anaesthesia”
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   July 2016
Choleric Temperamental Education for 1893 Classes by “Masters of Anaesthesia”
Anesthesiology 7 2016, Vol.125, 13. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000484135.18830.f5
Anesthesiology 7 2016, Vol.125, 13. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000484135.18830.f5
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ spear-wielding Cholericus (1583) reminds us that a fire-like patient of “choleric” temperament commanded the hot, dry “yellow bile” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental fire. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a choleric patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. PGSA founder and secretary, Professor Samuel J. Hayes, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that choleric patients might resist preanesthetic calming. Dr. Hayes also used the journal that he edited, The Dental and Surgical Microcosm, as a primer for teaching PGSA students about the dangers of cardiovascular “concussion” from anesthetic overdose. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ spear-wielding Cholericus (1583) reminds us that a fire-like patient of “choleric” temperament commanded the hot, dry “yellow bile” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental fire. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a choleric patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. PGSA founder and secretary, Professor Samuel J. Hayes, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that choleric patients might resist preanesthetic calming. Dr. Hayes also used the journal that he edited, The Dental and Surgical Microcosm, as a primer for teaching PGSA students about the dangers of cardiovascular “concussion” from anesthetic overdose. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ spear-wielding Cholericus (1583) reminds us that a fire-like patient of “choleric” temperament commanded the hot, dry “yellow bile” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental fire. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a choleric patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. PGSA founder and secretary, Professor Samuel J. Hayes, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that choleric patients might resist preanesthetic calming. Dr. Hayes also used the journal that he edited, The Dental and Surgical Microcosm, as a primer for teaching PGSA students about the dangers of cardiovascular “concussion” from anesthetic overdose. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ spear-wielding Cholericus (1583) reminds us that a fire-like patient of “choleric” temperament commanded the hot, dry “yellow bile” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental fire. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a choleric patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. PGSA founder and secretary, Professor Samuel J. Hayes, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that choleric patients might resist preanesthetic calming. Dr. Hayes also used the journal that he edited, The Dental and Surgical Microcosm, as a primer for teaching PGSA students about the dangers of cardiovascular “concussion” from anesthetic overdose. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ spear-wielding Cholericus (1583) reminds us that a fire-like patient of “choleric” temperament commanded the hot, dry “yellow bile” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental fire. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a choleric patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. PGSA founder and secretary, Professor Samuel J. Hayes, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that choleric patients might resist preanesthetic calming. Dr. Hayes also used the journal that he edited, The Dental and Surgical Microcosm, as a primer for teaching PGSA students about the dangers of cardiovascular “concussion” from anesthetic overdose. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Flemish artist Maerten de Vos’ spear-wielding Cholericus (1583) reminds us that a fire-like patient of “choleric” temperament commanded the hot, dry “yellow bile” humor linked by ancient Greeks with elemental fire. By 1893 at Chicago’s Post-Graduate School of Anaesthesia (PGSA), professors were tutoring future “Master of the Science of Anaesthesia” candidates to anticipate that a choleric patient’s anesthesia might comprise—what today’s anesthesiologists would characterize as—(1) a swift induction, (2) a risk for heart-depressing anesthetic overdosage (termed “concussion” by the PGSA), and (3) a stormy emergence. PGSA founder and secretary, Professor Samuel J. Hayes, D.D.S., M.S.A., taught that choleric patients might resist preanesthetic calming. Dr. Hayes also used the journal that he edited, The Dental and Surgical Microcosm, as a primer for teaching PGSA students about the dangers of cardiovascular “concussion” from anesthetic overdose. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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