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Correspondence  |   June 2016
In Reply
Author Notes
  • Brigham and Women’s Health Care and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. jrathmell@bwh.harvard.edu
  • (Accepted for publication February 17, 2016.)
    (Accepted for publication February 17, 2016.)×
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   June 2016
In Reply
Anesthesiology 6 2016, Vol.124, 1416. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001094
Anesthesiology 6 2016, Vol.124, 1416. doi:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001094
I want to thank Drs. Zetlaoui and Benhamou for pointing out the shortcomings of the ultrasound image I created to accompany a recent Editorial View1  and Original Research Article2  on the use of ultrasound to improve the safety of cricothyrotomy. Truth be told, this is my very own tracheal anatomy exactly at the level of the cricothyroid membrane. However, a combination of my own anatomy (small distance between my cricoid and thyroid cartilages) and the ultrasound probe that I had on hand that day conspired to make it impossible to get an image that nicely demonstrated the ultrasonographic anatomy of the cricothyroid membrane itself. I want to thank these authors for reading the journal so closely and for taking the time to assemble the excellent images for our readers.
Competing Interests
The author declares no competing interests.
James P. Rathmell, M.D., Brigham and Women’s Health Care and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. jrathmell@bwh.harvard.edu
References
Asai, T Emergency cricothyrotomy: Toward a safer and more reliable rescue method in “cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate” situation.. Anesthesiology. (2015). 123 995–6 [Article] [PubMed]
Siddiqui, N, Arzola, C, Friedman, Z, Guerina, L, You-Ten, KE Ultrasound improves cricothyrotomy success in cadavers with poorly defined neck anatomy: A randomized control trial.. Anesthesiology. (2015). 123 1033–41 [Article] [PubMed]