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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   June 2016
Cyclopropane and the Explosive “Power of the Cylinder”
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   June 2016
Cyclopropane and the Explosive “Power of the Cylinder”
Anesthesiology 6 2016, Vol.124, 1212. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000482717.27474.a3
Anesthesiology 6 2016, Vol.124, 1212. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000482717.27474.a3
In 1933 Wisconsin’s Ralph M. Waters, M.D. (1883–1979), introduced cyclopropane (C3H6) as an inhalational anesthetic renowned for its smooth inductions and potentially devastating explosions. From Cleveland, Ohio, near the then headquarters of the International Anesthesia Research Society, the Ohio Chemical and Manufacturing Company popularized various compressed gas cylinders for cyclopropane. Their sparkplug-sized mini-cylinders (top left and right) were designed to dispense 3 liters of cyclopropane from field apparatus designed by Dr. Robert Hingson and others. Near the headquarters of the then “American Society of Anesthetists” in New York City, E. R. Squibb & Sons produced various cyclopropane cylinders, including this “No. 6 Amplon” (bottom), which dispensed 22.7 liters (6 gallons). When contrasting general anesthetic inductions by inhalational agents, New York’s Emery A. Rovenstine, M.D. (1895–1960), characterized ether as the “beer” and cyclopropane as the “champagne.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In 1933 Wisconsin’s Ralph M. Waters, M.D. (1883–1979), introduced cyclopropane (C3H6) as an inhalational anesthetic renowned for its smooth inductions and potentially devastating explosions. From Cleveland, Ohio, near the then headquarters of the International Anesthesia Research Society, the Ohio Chemical and Manufacturing Company popularized various compressed gas cylinders for cyclopropane. Their sparkplug-sized mini-cylinders (top left and right) were designed to dispense 3 liters of cyclopropane from field apparatus designed by Dr. Robert Hingson and others. Near the headquarters of the then “American Society of Anesthetists” in New York City, E. R. Squibb & Sons produced various cyclopropane cylinders, including this “No. 6 Amplon” (bottom), which dispensed 22.7 liters (6 gallons). When contrasting general anesthetic inductions by inhalational agents, New York’s Emery A. Rovenstine, M.D. (1895–1960), characterized ether as the “beer” and cyclopropane as the “champagne.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In 1933 Wisconsin’s Ralph M. Waters, M.D. (1883–1979), introduced cyclopropane (C3H6) as an inhalational anesthetic renowned for its smooth inductions and potentially devastating explosions. From Cleveland, Ohio, near the then headquarters of the International Anesthesia Research Society, the Ohio Chemical and Manufacturing Company popularized various compressed gas cylinders for cyclopropane. Their sparkplug-sized mini-cylinders (top left and right) were designed to dispense 3 liters of cyclopropane from field apparatus designed by Dr. Robert Hingson and others. Near the headquarters of the then “American Society of Anesthetists” in New York City, E. R. Squibb & Sons produced various cyclopropane cylinders, including this “No. 6 Amplon” (bottom), which dispensed 22.7 liters (6 gallons). When contrasting general anesthetic inductions by inhalational agents, New York’s Emery A. Rovenstine, M.D. (1895–1960), characterized ether as the “beer” and cyclopropane as the “champagne.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
In 1933 Wisconsin’s Ralph M. Waters, M.D. (1883–1979), introduced cyclopropane (C3H6) as an inhalational anesthetic renowned for its smooth inductions and potentially devastating explosions. From Cleveland, Ohio, near the then headquarters of the International Anesthesia Research Society, the Ohio Chemical and Manufacturing Company popularized various compressed gas cylinders for cyclopropane. Their sparkplug-sized mini-cylinders (top left and right) were designed to dispense 3 liters of cyclopropane from field apparatus designed by Dr. Robert Hingson and others. Near the headquarters of the then “American Society of Anesthetists” in New York City, E. R. Squibb & Sons produced various cyclopropane cylinders, including this “No. 6 Amplon” (bottom), which dispensed 22.7 liters (6 gallons). When contrasting general anesthetic inductions by inhalational agents, New York’s Emery A. Rovenstine, M.D. (1895–1960), characterized ether as the “beer” and cyclopropane as the “champagne.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In 1933 Wisconsin’s Ralph M. Waters, M.D. (1883–1979), introduced cyclopropane (C3H6) as an inhalational anesthetic renowned for its smooth inductions and potentially devastating explosions. From Cleveland, Ohio, near the then headquarters of the International Anesthesia Research Society, the Ohio Chemical and Manufacturing Company popularized various compressed gas cylinders for cyclopropane. Their sparkplug-sized mini-cylinders (top left and right) were designed to dispense 3 liters of cyclopropane from field apparatus designed by Dr. Robert Hingson and others. Near the headquarters of the then “American Society of Anesthetists” in New York City, E. R. Squibb & Sons produced various cyclopropane cylinders, including this “No. 6 Amplon” (bottom), which dispensed 22.7 liters (6 gallons). When contrasting general anesthetic inductions by inhalational agents, New York’s Emery A. Rovenstine, M.D. (1895–1960), characterized ether as the “beer” and cyclopropane as the “champagne.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In 1933 Wisconsin’s Ralph M. Waters, M.D. (1883–1979), introduced cyclopropane (C3H6) as an inhalational anesthetic renowned for its smooth inductions and potentially devastating explosions. From Cleveland, Ohio, near the then headquarters of the International Anesthesia Research Society, the Ohio Chemical and Manufacturing Company popularized various compressed gas cylinders for cyclopropane. Their sparkplug-sized mini-cylinders (top left and right) were designed to dispense 3 liters of cyclopropane from field apparatus designed by Dr. Robert Hingson and others. Near the headquarters of the then “American Society of Anesthetists” in New York City, E. R. Squibb & Sons produced various cyclopropane cylinders, including this “No. 6 Amplon” (bottom), which dispensed 22.7 liters (6 gallons). When contrasting general anesthetic inductions by inhalational agents, New York’s Emery A. Rovenstine, M.D. (1895–1960), characterized ether as the “beer” and cyclopropane as the “champagne.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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