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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   April 2016
Advertising and Uncovering E. H. Neiman’s “New Anaesthetic”
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   April 2016
Advertising and Uncovering E. H. Neiman’s “New Anaesthetic”
Anesthesiology 4 2016, Vol.124, 884. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000480999.60802.8c
Anesthesiology 4 2016, Vol.124, 884. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000480999.60802.8c
From “the General and Dental Hospitals, Birmingham,” British anesthetist W. J. McCardie reported “A Few Cases of Ethyl Chloride Narcosis” in the March 9, 1901, issue of The Lancet. Initially used on gums for its local refrigerant effect, ethyl chloride was rapidly discovered by clinicians to cause dozing and even general anesthesia in patients who were generously dosed. So, E. H. Neiman, D.D.S., of York, Pennsylvania, was likely advertising ethyl chloride with his colorful trade card (top). On the card’s reverse, he noted that his “new Anaesthetic … originally in use in England” was “introduced there in 1901.” Dr. Neiman’s willingness to offer newer anesthetics may have comforted patients whom he might have previously unnerved by advertising that he had attended “three different colleges….” This trade card is part of the WLM’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
From “the General and Dental Hospitals, Birmingham,” British anesthetist W. J. McCardie reported “A Few Cases of Ethyl Chloride Narcosis” in the March 9, 1901, issue of The Lancet. Initially used on gums for its local refrigerant effect, ethyl chloride was rapidly discovered by clinicians to cause dozing and even general anesthesia in patients who were generously dosed. So, E. H. Neiman, D.D.S., of York, Pennsylvania, was likely advertising ethyl chloride with his colorful trade card (top). On the card’s reverse, he noted that his “new Anaesthetic … originally in use in England” was “introduced there in 1901.” Dr. Neiman’s willingness to offer newer anesthetics may have comforted patients whom he might have previously unnerved by advertising that he had attended “three different colleges….” This trade card is part of the WLM’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
From “the General and Dental Hospitals, Birmingham,” British anesthetist W. J. McCardie reported “A Few Cases of Ethyl Chloride Narcosis” in the March 9, 1901, issue of The Lancet. Initially used on gums for its local refrigerant effect, ethyl chloride was rapidly discovered by clinicians to cause dozing and even general anesthesia in patients who were generously dosed. So, E. H. Neiman, D.D.S., of York, Pennsylvania, was likely advertising ethyl chloride with his colorful trade card (top). On the card’s reverse, he noted that his “new Anaesthetic … originally in use in England” was “introduced there in 1901.” Dr. Neiman’s willingness to offer newer anesthetics may have comforted patients whom he might have previously unnerved by advertising that he had attended “three different colleges….” This trade card is part of the WLM’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
From “the General and Dental Hospitals, Birmingham,” British anesthetist W. J. McCardie reported “A Few Cases of Ethyl Chloride Narcosis” in the March 9, 1901, issue of The Lancet. Initially used on gums for its local refrigerant effect, ethyl chloride was rapidly discovered by clinicians to cause dozing and even general anesthesia in patients who were generously dosed. So, E. H. Neiman, D.D.S., of York, Pennsylvania, was likely advertising ethyl chloride with his colorful trade card (top). On the card’s reverse, he noted that his “new Anaesthetic … originally in use in England” was “introduced there in 1901.” Dr. Neiman’s willingness to offer newer anesthetics may have comforted patients whom he might have previously unnerved by advertising that he had attended “three different colleges….” This trade card is part of the WLM’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
From “the General and Dental Hospitals, Birmingham,” British anesthetist W. J. McCardie reported “A Few Cases of Ethyl Chloride Narcosis” in the March 9, 1901, issue of The Lancet. Initially used on gums for its local refrigerant effect, ethyl chloride was rapidly discovered by clinicians to cause dozing and even general anesthesia in patients who were generously dosed. So, E. H. Neiman, D.D.S., of York, Pennsylvania, was likely advertising ethyl chloride with his colorful trade card (top). On the card’s reverse, he noted that his “new Anaesthetic … originally in use in England” was “introduced there in 1901.” Dr. Neiman’s willingness to offer newer anesthetics may have comforted patients whom he might have previously unnerved by advertising that he had attended “three different colleges….” This trade card is part of the WLM’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
From “the General and Dental Hospitals, Birmingham,” British anesthetist W. J. McCardie reported “A Few Cases of Ethyl Chloride Narcosis” in the March 9, 1901, issue of The Lancet. Initially used on gums for its local refrigerant effect, ethyl chloride was rapidly discovered by clinicians to cause dozing and even general anesthesia in patients who were generously dosed. So, E. H. Neiman, D.D.S., of York, Pennsylvania, was likely advertising ethyl chloride with his colorful trade card (top). On the card’s reverse, he noted that his “new Anaesthetic … originally in use in England” was “introduced there in 1901.” Dr. Neiman’s willingness to offer newer anesthetics may have comforted patients whom he might have previously unnerved by advertising that he had attended “three different colleges….” This trade card is part of the WLM’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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