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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   March 2016
A “Nitrous Oxide Gas” Advertising Bookmark from Dr. A. K. Harroun
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   March 2016
A “Nitrous Oxide Gas” Advertising Bookmark from Dr. A. K. Harroun
Anesthesiology 3 2016, Vol.124, 579. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000479919.35813.bb
Anesthesiology 3 2016, Vol.124, 579. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000479919.35813.bb
According to the July 1882 issue of The Odontographic Journal, “the bogus dental college of Morrison & Co., at Delevan, Wis[consin] … issued an ‘announcement’ … with … a list of its graduates … [whose] sheepskins are going ‘dog cheap’ at twelve dollars.” One of the 1881 graduates listed is “A. K. Harroun, … Pennsylvania.” On his advertising bookmark above, that graduate lists himself as “A. K. Harroun, D.D.S. Dental Rooms … Honesdale, Pa.” Because his office shifted from 125 to 255 Main Street, Dr. Harroun had to strike the old address and stamp in the new one on his old stock of bookmarks. He is careful to note that, “Teeth extracted without pain with Nitrous Oxide Gas.”
From the mid-1860s through the 1880s, most dentists who administered laughing gas to patients were titled “Dr.” as an honorific rather than by an earned degree. Among dentists who learned their profession from a preceptor rather than a professor, most resisted ordering mail order degrees from “Morrison & Co.” This advertising bookmark is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
According to the July 1882 issue of The Odontographic Journal, “the bogus dental college of Morrison & Co., at Delevan, Wis[consin] … issued an ‘announcement’ … with … a list of its graduates … [whose] sheepskins are going ‘dog cheap’ at twelve dollars.” One of the 1881 graduates listed is “A. K. Harroun, … Pennsylvania.” On his advertising bookmark above, that graduate lists himself as “A. K. Harroun, D.D.S. Dental Rooms … Honesdale, Pa.” Because his office shifted from 125 to 255 Main Street, Dr. Harroun had to strike the old address and stamp in the new one on his old stock of bookmarks. He is careful to note that, “Teeth extracted without pain with Nitrous Oxide Gas.”
According to the July 1882 issue of The Odontographic Journal, “the bogus dental college of Morrison & Co., at Delevan, Wis[consin] … issued an ‘announcement’ … with … a list of its graduates … [whose] sheepskins are going ‘dog cheap’ at twelve dollars.” One of the 1881 graduates listed is “A. K. Harroun, … Pennsylvania.” On his advertising bookmark above, that graduate lists himself as “A. K. Harroun, D.D.S. Dental Rooms … Honesdale, Pa.” Because his office shifted from 125 to 255 Main Street, Dr. Harroun had to strike the old address and stamp in the new one on his old stock of bookmarks. He is careful to note that, “Teeth extracted without pain with Nitrous Oxide Gas.”
From the mid-1860s through the 1880s, most dentists who administered laughing gas to patients were titled “Dr.” as an honorific rather than by an earned degree. Among dentists who learned their profession from a preceptor rather than a professor, most resisted ordering mail order degrees from “Morrison & Co.” This advertising bookmark is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
According to the July 1882 issue of The Odontographic Journal, “the bogus dental college of Morrison & Co., at Delevan, Wis[consin] … issued an ‘announcement’ … with … a list of its graduates … [whose] sheepskins are going ‘dog cheap’ at twelve dollars.” One of the 1881 graduates listed is “A. K. Harroun, … Pennsylvania.” On his advertising bookmark above, that graduate lists himself as “A. K. Harroun, D.D.S. Dental Rooms … Honesdale, Pa.” Because his office shifted from 125 to 255 Main Street, Dr. Harroun had to strike the old address and stamp in the new one on his old stock of bookmarks. He is careful to note that, “Teeth extracted without pain with Nitrous Oxide Gas.”
From the mid-1860s through the 1880s, most dentists who administered laughing gas to patients were titled “Dr.” as an honorific rather than by an earned degree. Among dentists who learned their profession from a preceptor rather than a professor, most resisted ordering mail order degrees from “Morrison & Co.” This advertising bookmark is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
According to the July 1882 issue of The Odontographic Journal, “the bogus dental college of Morrison & Co., at Delevan, Wis[consin] … issued an ‘announcement’ … with … a list of its graduates … [whose] sheepskins are going ‘dog cheap’ at twelve dollars.” One of the 1881 graduates listed is “A. K. Harroun, … Pennsylvania.” On his advertising bookmark above, that graduate lists himself as “A. K. Harroun, D.D.S. Dental Rooms … Honesdale, Pa.” Because his office shifted from 125 to 255 Main Street, Dr. Harroun had to strike the old address and stamp in the new one on his old stock of bookmarks. He is careful to note that, “Teeth extracted without pain with Nitrous Oxide Gas.”
According to the July 1882 issue of The Odontographic Journal, “the bogus dental college of Morrison & Co., at Delevan, Wis[consin] … issued an ‘announcement’ … with … a list of its graduates … [whose] sheepskins are going ‘dog cheap’ at twelve dollars.” One of the 1881 graduates listed is “A. K. Harroun, … Pennsylvania.” On his advertising bookmark above, that graduate lists himself as “A. K. Harroun, D.D.S. Dental Rooms … Honesdale, Pa.” Because his office shifted from 125 to 255 Main Street, Dr. Harroun had to strike the old address and stamp in the new one on his old stock of bookmarks. He is careful to note that, “Teeth extracted without pain with Nitrous Oxide Gas.”
From the mid-1860s through the 1880s, most dentists who administered laughing gas to patients were titled “Dr.” as an honorific rather than by an earned degree. Among dentists who learned their profession from a preceptor rather than a professor, most resisted ordering mail order degrees from “Morrison & Co.” This advertising bookmark is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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