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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   January 2016
The 41-cent Postage Stamp of Linus Pauling
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   January 2016
The 41-cent Postage Stamp of Linus Pauling
Anesthesiology 1 2016, Vol.124, 34. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000473724.58125.e0
Anesthesiology 1 2016, Vol.124, 34. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000473724.58125.e0
At the Corvallis alma mater of Dr. Linus Pauling, Oregon State University, and in New York City, public ceremonies on March 6, 2008, celebrated the release of the U.S. Postal Service’s second pane of the American Scientists issuance. This release featured 41-cent stamps honoring four scientists: biochemist Gerty Cori, astronomer Edwin Hubble, physicist John Bardeen, and chemist (and stamp collector) Linus Pauling. The year before becoming the first person to have received two unshared Nobel Prizes (Chemistry, 1954; Peace, 1962), Pauling had published in Science his hydrate microcrystal theory of anesthesia. As originally painted by artist Victor Stabin, the image on the Pauling stamp (above) combines a version of Pauling’s second Nobel portrait with illustrations of sickled red blood cells (erythrocytes) from one of his hundreds of research papers. Oregonian Kyle Odegard reported that “Pauling’s research on sickle cell anemia combined medicine, biology and chemistry.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
At the Corvallis alma mater of Dr. Linus Pauling, Oregon State University, and in New York City, public ceremonies on March 6, 2008, celebrated the release of the U.S. Postal Service’s second pane of the American Scientists issuance. This release featured 41-cent stamps honoring four scientists: biochemist Gerty Cori, astronomer Edwin Hubble, physicist John Bardeen, and chemist (and stamp collector) Linus Pauling. The year before becoming the first person to have received two unshared Nobel Prizes (Chemistry, 1954; Peace, 1962), Pauling had published in Science his hydrate microcrystal theory of anesthesia. As originally painted by artist Victor Stabin, the image on the Pauling stamp (above) combines a version of Pauling’s second Nobel portrait with illustrations of sickled red blood cells (erythrocytes) from one of his hundreds of research papers. Oregonian Kyle Odegard reported that “Pauling’s research on sickle cell anemia combined medicine, biology and chemistry.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
At the Corvallis alma mater of Dr. Linus Pauling, Oregon State University, and in New York City, public ceremonies on March 6, 2008, celebrated the release of the U.S. Postal Service’s second pane of the American Scientists issuance. This release featured 41-cent stamps honoring four scientists: biochemist Gerty Cori, astronomer Edwin Hubble, physicist John Bardeen, and chemist (and stamp collector) Linus Pauling. The year before becoming the first person to have received two unshared Nobel Prizes (Chemistry, 1954; Peace, 1962), Pauling had published in Science his hydrate microcrystal theory of anesthesia. As originally painted by artist Victor Stabin, the image on the Pauling stamp (above) combines a version of Pauling’s second Nobel portrait with illustrations of sickled red blood cells (erythrocytes) from one of his hundreds of research papers. Oregonian Kyle Odegard reported that “Pauling’s research on sickle cell anemia combined medicine, biology and chemistry.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
At the Corvallis alma mater of Dr. Linus Pauling, Oregon State University, and in New York City, public ceremonies on March 6, 2008, celebrated the release of the U.S. Postal Service’s second pane of the American Scientists issuance. This release featured 41-cent stamps honoring four scientists: biochemist Gerty Cori, astronomer Edwin Hubble, physicist John Bardeen, and chemist (and stamp collector) Linus Pauling. The year before becoming the first person to have received two unshared Nobel Prizes (Chemistry, 1954; Peace, 1962), Pauling had published in Science his hydrate microcrystal theory of anesthesia. As originally painted by artist Victor Stabin, the image on the Pauling stamp (above) combines a version of Pauling’s second Nobel portrait with illustrations of sickled red blood cells (erythrocytes) from one of his hundreds of research papers. Oregonian Kyle Odegard reported that “Pauling’s research on sickle cell anemia combined medicine, biology and chemistry.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
At the Corvallis alma mater of Dr. Linus Pauling, Oregon State University, and in New York City, public ceremonies on March 6, 2008, celebrated the release of the U.S. Postal Service’s second pane of the American Scientists issuance. This release featured 41-cent stamps honoring four scientists: biochemist Gerty Cori, astronomer Edwin Hubble, physicist John Bardeen, and chemist (and stamp collector) Linus Pauling. The year before becoming the first person to have received two unshared Nobel Prizes (Chemistry, 1954; Peace, 1962), Pauling had published in Science his hydrate microcrystal theory of anesthesia. As originally painted by artist Victor Stabin, the image on the Pauling stamp (above) combines a version of Pauling’s second Nobel portrait with illustrations of sickled red blood cells (erythrocytes) from one of his hundreds of research papers. Oregonian Kyle Odegard reported that “Pauling’s research on sickle cell anemia combined medicine, biology and chemistry.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
At the Corvallis alma mater of Dr. Linus Pauling, Oregon State University, and in New York City, public ceremonies on March 6, 2008, celebrated the release of the U.S. Postal Service’s second pane of the American Scientists issuance. This release featured 41-cent stamps honoring four scientists: biochemist Gerty Cori, astronomer Edwin Hubble, physicist John Bardeen, and chemist (and stamp collector) Linus Pauling. The year before becoming the first person to have received two unshared Nobel Prizes (Chemistry, 1954; Peace, 1962), Pauling had published in Science his hydrate microcrystal theory of anesthesia. As originally painted by artist Victor Stabin, the image on the Pauling stamp (above) combines a version of Pauling’s second Nobel portrait with illustrations of sickled red blood cells (erythrocytes) from one of his hundreds of research papers. Oregonian Kyle Odegard reported that “Pauling’s research on sickle cell anemia combined medicine, biology and chemistry.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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