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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   December 2015
F. A. Sweetland’s “Liquid Nitrous Oxide” Trade Card
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   December 2015
F. A. Sweetland’s “Liquid Nitrous Oxide” Trade Card
Anesthesiology 12 2015, Vol.123, 1291. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000472937.96829.e5
Anesthesiology 12 2015, Vol.123, 1291. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000472937.96829.e5
A native of Dryden, New York, Dr. Frederick Augustus “Fred” Sweetland (1827–1908) was a dentist who practiced most of his later years about 150 miles southwest of Chicago, in Wyoming, Illinois. On his trade card (above), Sweetland advertised in May of 1888 that he would travel the 65 miles southeast in Illinois, from Wyoming to Danvers, and offer “TEETH EXTRACTED WITHOUT PAIN by the use of Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” During the quarter century after laughing gas had been repopularized for dental anesthesia, the rising tide of postanesthetic complications were blamed frequently upon administration of impure nitrous oxide to patients. By using newer technology for furnishing “gas” from tanks filled with pure, condensed (liquid) nitrous oxide, a dental or medical practitioner could reassure patients that they were receiving safer “Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
A native of Dryden, New York, Dr. Frederick Augustus “Fred” Sweetland (1827–1908) was a dentist who practiced most of his later years about 150 miles southwest of Chicago, in Wyoming, Illinois. On his trade card (above), Sweetland advertised in May of 1888 that he would travel the 65 miles southeast in Illinois, from Wyoming to Danvers, and offer “TEETH EXTRACTED WITHOUT PAIN by the use of Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” During the quarter century after laughing gas had been repopularized for dental anesthesia, the rising tide of postanesthetic complications were blamed frequently upon administration of impure nitrous oxide to patients. By using newer technology for furnishing “gas” from tanks filled with pure, condensed (liquid) nitrous oxide, a dental or medical practitioner could reassure patients that they were receiving safer “Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
A native of Dryden, New York, Dr. Frederick Augustus “Fred” Sweetland (1827–1908) was a dentist who practiced most of his later years about 150 miles southwest of Chicago, in Wyoming, Illinois. On his trade card (above), Sweetland advertised in May of 1888 that he would travel the 65 miles southeast in Illinois, from Wyoming to Danvers, and offer “TEETH EXTRACTED WITHOUT PAIN by the use of Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” During the quarter century after laughing gas had been repopularized for dental anesthesia, the rising tide of postanesthetic complications were blamed frequently upon administration of impure nitrous oxide to patients. By using newer technology for furnishing “gas” from tanks filled with pure, condensed (liquid) nitrous oxide, a dental or medical practitioner could reassure patients that they were receiving safer “Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
A native of Dryden, New York, Dr. Frederick Augustus “Fred” Sweetland (1827–1908) was a dentist who practiced most of his later years about 150 miles southwest of Chicago, in Wyoming, Illinois. On his trade card (above), Sweetland advertised in May of 1888 that he would travel the 65 miles southeast in Illinois, from Wyoming to Danvers, and offer “TEETH EXTRACTED WITHOUT PAIN by the use of Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” During the quarter century after laughing gas had been repopularized for dental anesthesia, the rising tide of postanesthetic complications were blamed frequently upon administration of impure nitrous oxide to patients. By using newer technology for furnishing “gas” from tanks filled with pure, condensed (liquid) nitrous oxide, a dental or medical practitioner could reassure patients that they were receiving safer “Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
A native of Dryden, New York, Dr. Frederick Augustus “Fred” Sweetland (1827–1908) was a dentist who practiced most of his later years about 150 miles southwest of Chicago, in Wyoming, Illinois. On his trade card (above), Sweetland advertised in May of 1888 that he would travel the 65 miles southeast in Illinois, from Wyoming to Danvers, and offer “TEETH EXTRACTED WITHOUT PAIN by the use of Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” During the quarter century after laughing gas had been repopularized for dental anesthesia, the rising tide of postanesthetic complications were blamed frequently upon administration of impure nitrous oxide to patients. By using newer technology for furnishing “gas” from tanks filled with pure, condensed (liquid) nitrous oxide, a dental or medical practitioner could reassure patients that they were receiving safer “Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
A native of Dryden, New York, Dr. Frederick Augustus “Fred” Sweetland (1827–1908) was a dentist who practiced most of his later years about 150 miles southwest of Chicago, in Wyoming, Illinois. On his trade card (above), Sweetland advertised in May of 1888 that he would travel the 65 miles southeast in Illinois, from Wyoming to Danvers, and offer “TEETH EXTRACTED WITHOUT PAIN by the use of Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” During the quarter century after laughing gas had been repopularized for dental anesthesia, the rising tide of postanesthetic complications were blamed frequently upon administration of impure nitrous oxide to patients. By using newer technology for furnishing “gas” from tanks filled with pure, condensed (liquid) nitrous oxide, a dental or medical practitioner could reassure patients that they were receiving safer “Pure Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.” (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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