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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   December 2015
Carte-de-Visite of Velpeau by Reutlinger
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   December 2015
Carte-de-Visite of Velpeau by Reutlinger
Anesthesiology 12 2015, Vol.123, 1220. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000472936.89205.bd
Anesthesiology 12 2015, Vol.123, 1220. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000472936.89205.bd
A business card of its day, the carte-de-visite (CDV, or “visitation card”) consisted of a thin 54 × 89-mm albumen photographic print mounted upon a thicker 64 × 100-mm cardboard backing. The CDV (above) depicts one of France’s most gifted anatomists and surgeons, Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie Velpeau (1795–1867). He flourished professionally in Paris. In volume 1 of his Medicine Operatoire (1839), Velpeau observed, “To avoid pain in surgical operations is a chimera which it is not permitted to pursue at this day. Cutting-instrument and pain, the one without the other, to the minds of patients, and it is necessary to admit the association.” After receiving the news about Boston’s Ether Day in 1846, Velpeau would eventually reverse his highly quoted opinion, perhaps eliciting an expression as pained as the one captured (left) by his photographer, Ch. Reutlinger (right). (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
A business card of its day, the carte-de-visite (CDV, or “visitation card”) consisted of a thin 54 × 89-mm albumen photographic print mounted upon a thicker 64 × 100-mm cardboard backing. The CDV (above) depicts one of France’s most gifted anatomists and surgeons, Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie Velpeau (1795–1867). He flourished professionally in Paris. In volume 1 of his Medicine Operatoire (1839), Velpeau observed, “To avoid pain in surgical operations is a chimera which it is not permitted to pursue at this day. Cutting-instrument and pain, the one without the other, to the minds of patients, and it is necessary to admit the association.” After receiving the news about Boston’s Ether Day in 1846, Velpeau would eventually reverse his highly quoted opinion, perhaps eliciting an expression as pained as the one captured (left) by his photographer, Ch. Reutlinger (right). (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
A business card of its day, the carte-de-visite (CDV, or “visitation card”) consisted of a thin 54 × 89-mm albumen photographic print mounted upon a thicker 64 × 100-mm cardboard backing. The CDV (above) depicts one of France’s most gifted anatomists and surgeons, Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie Velpeau (1795–1867). He flourished professionally in Paris. In volume 1 of his Medicine Operatoire (1839), Velpeau observed, “To avoid pain in surgical operations is a chimera which it is not permitted to pursue at this day. Cutting-instrument and pain, the one without the other, to the minds of patients, and it is necessary to admit the association.” After receiving the news about Boston’s Ether Day in 1846, Velpeau would eventually reverse his highly quoted opinion, perhaps eliciting an expression as pained as the one captured (left) by his photographer, Ch. Reutlinger (right). (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
A business card of its day, the carte-de-visite (CDV, or “visitation card”) consisted of a thin 54 × 89-mm albumen photographic print mounted upon a thicker 64 × 100-mm cardboard backing. The CDV (above) depicts one of France’s most gifted anatomists and surgeons, Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie Velpeau (1795–1867). He flourished professionally in Paris. In volume 1 of his Medicine Operatoire (1839), Velpeau observed, “To avoid pain in surgical operations is a chimera which it is not permitted to pursue at this day. Cutting-instrument and pain, the one without the other, to the minds of patients, and it is necessary to admit the association.” After receiving the news about Boston’s Ether Day in 1846, Velpeau would eventually reverse his highly quoted opinion, perhaps eliciting an expression as pained as the one captured (left) by his photographer, Ch. Reutlinger (right). (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
A business card of its day, the carte-de-visite (CDV, or “visitation card”) consisted of a thin 54 × 89-mm albumen photographic print mounted upon a thicker 64 × 100-mm cardboard backing. The CDV (above) depicts one of France’s most gifted anatomists and surgeons, Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie Velpeau (1795–1867). He flourished professionally in Paris. In volume 1 of his Medicine Operatoire (1839), Velpeau observed, “To avoid pain in surgical operations is a chimera which it is not permitted to pursue at this day. Cutting-instrument and pain, the one without the other, to the minds of patients, and it is necessary to admit the association.” After receiving the news about Boston’s Ether Day in 1846, Velpeau would eventually reverse his highly quoted opinion, perhaps eliciting an expression as pained as the one captured (left) by his photographer, Ch. Reutlinger (right). (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
A business card of its day, the carte-de-visite (CDV, or “visitation card”) consisted of a thin 54 × 89-mm albumen photographic print mounted upon a thicker 64 × 100-mm cardboard backing. The CDV (above) depicts one of France’s most gifted anatomists and surgeons, Alfred-Armand-Louis-Marie Velpeau (1795–1867). He flourished professionally in Paris. In volume 1 of his Medicine Operatoire (1839), Velpeau observed, “To avoid pain in surgical operations is a chimera which it is not permitted to pursue at this day. Cutting-instrument and pain, the one without the other, to the minds of patients, and it is necessary to admit the association.” After receiving the news about Boston’s Ether Day in 1846, Velpeau would eventually reverse his highly quoted opinion, perhaps eliciting an expression as pained as the one captured (left) by his photographer, Ch. Reutlinger (right). (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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