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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   October 2015
Fanny Davenport and the Doctors Rugg: 25-cent “Extracting, with Gas”
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   October 2015
Fanny Davenport and the Doctors Rugg: 25-cent “Extracting, with Gas”
Anesthesiology 10 2015, Vol.123, 837. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000470958.87417.20
Anesthesiology 10 2015, Vol.123, 837. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000470958.87417.20
In August of 1879, the Doctors Rugg registered as dentists practicing at 777 Broadway in Albany, the capital city of the State of New York. In less than a decade the Ruggs were advertising (right) that their Albany City Dental Association (ACDA) was the “Largest Private Dental Establishment in the World.” Part of their successful advertising included distributing trade cards featuring Fanny Lily Gipsy Davenport (1850–1898). London-born and Bostoneducated, Fanny Davenport (left) was a celebrated thespian for the final 36 of her abbreviated lifetime of only 48 years. Just 2 years her junior, the younger dentist, Dr. Newton P. Rugg (1852–1907), worked as ACDA’s secretary. His uncle and managing dental partner was Dr. Datus E. Rugg (1819–1898), a former blacksmith. ACDA’s patients were likely relieved to learn that the managing partner had traded in his forging hammer for nitrous oxide—and that “Extracting, with Gas“ cost only 25 cents. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In August of 1879, the Doctors Rugg registered as dentists practicing at 777 Broadway in Albany, the capital city of the State of New York. In less than a decade the Ruggs were advertising (right) that their Albany City Dental Association (ACDA) was the “Largest Private Dental Establishment in the World.” Part of their successful advertising included distributing trade cards featuring Fanny Lily Gipsy Davenport (1850–1898). London-born and Bostoneducated, Fanny Davenport (left) was a celebrated thespian for the final 36 of her abbreviated lifetime of only 48 years. Just 2 years her junior, the younger dentist, Dr. Newton P. Rugg (1852–1907), worked as ACDA’s secretary. His uncle and managing dental partner was Dr. Datus E. Rugg (1819–1898), a former blacksmith. ACDA’s patients were likely relieved to learn that the managing partner had traded in his forging hammer for nitrous oxide—and that “Extracting, with Gas“ cost only 25 cents. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In August of 1879, the Doctors Rugg registered as dentists practicing at 777 Broadway in Albany, the capital city of the State of New York. In less than a decade the Ruggs were advertising (right) that their Albany City Dental Association (ACDA) was the “Largest Private Dental Establishment in the World.” Part of their successful advertising included distributing trade cards featuring Fanny Lily Gipsy Davenport (1850–1898). London-born and Bostoneducated, Fanny Davenport (left) was a celebrated thespian for the final 36 of her abbreviated lifetime of only 48 years. Just 2 years her junior, the younger dentist, Dr. Newton P. Rugg (1852–1907), worked as ACDA’s secretary. His uncle and managing dental partner was Dr. Datus E. Rugg (1819–1898), a former blacksmith. ACDA’s patients were likely relieved to learn that the managing partner had traded in his forging hammer for nitrous oxide—and that “Extracting, with Gas“ cost only 25 cents. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
In August of 1879, the Doctors Rugg registered as dentists practicing at 777 Broadway in Albany, the capital city of the State of New York. In less than a decade the Ruggs were advertising (right) that their Albany City Dental Association (ACDA) was the “Largest Private Dental Establishment in the World.” Part of their successful advertising included distributing trade cards featuring Fanny Lily Gipsy Davenport (1850–1898). London-born and Bostoneducated, Fanny Davenport (left) was a celebrated thespian for the final 36 of her abbreviated lifetime of only 48 years. Just 2 years her junior, the younger dentist, Dr. Newton P. Rugg (1852–1907), worked as ACDA’s secretary. His uncle and managing dental partner was Dr. Datus E. Rugg (1819–1898), a former blacksmith. ACDA’s patients were likely relieved to learn that the managing partner had traded in his forging hammer for nitrous oxide—and that “Extracting, with Gas“ cost only 25 cents. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In August of 1879, the Doctors Rugg registered as dentists practicing at 777 Broadway in Albany, the capital city of the State of New York. In less than a decade the Ruggs were advertising (right) that their Albany City Dental Association (ACDA) was the “Largest Private Dental Establishment in the World.” Part of their successful advertising included distributing trade cards featuring Fanny Lily Gipsy Davenport (1850–1898). London-born and Bostoneducated, Fanny Davenport (left) was a celebrated thespian for the final 36 of her abbreviated lifetime of only 48 years. Just 2 years her junior, the younger dentist, Dr. Newton P. Rugg (1852–1907), worked as ACDA’s secretary. His uncle and managing dental partner was Dr. Datus E. Rugg (1819–1898), a former blacksmith. ACDA’s patients were likely relieved to learn that the managing partner had traded in his forging hammer for nitrous oxide—and that “Extracting, with Gas“ cost only 25 cents. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In August of 1879, the Doctors Rugg registered as dentists practicing at 777 Broadway in Albany, the capital city of the State of New York. In less than a decade the Ruggs were advertising (right) that their Albany City Dental Association (ACDA) was the “Largest Private Dental Establishment in the World.” Part of their successful advertising included distributing trade cards featuring Fanny Lily Gipsy Davenport (1850–1898). London-born and Bostoneducated, Fanny Davenport (left) was a celebrated thespian for the final 36 of her abbreviated lifetime of only 48 years. Just 2 years her junior, the younger dentist, Dr. Newton P. Rugg (1852–1907), worked as ACDA’s secretary. His uncle and managing dental partner was Dr. Datus E. Rugg (1819–1898), a former blacksmith. ACDA’s patients were likely relieved to learn that the managing partner had traded in his forging hammer for nitrous oxide—and that “Extracting, with Gas“ cost only 25 cents. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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