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Correspondence  |   July 2007
Antidotes to Anesthetic Catastrophe: Lipid Emulsion and Dantrolene
Author Notes
  • Department of Anesthesiology; Wake Forest University School of Medicine; Medical Center Boulevard; Winston-Salem, NC; (Groban, Gerancher, Weller)
  • Indiana University School of Medicine; Indianapolis, IN (Butterworth)
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   July 2007
Antidotes to Anesthetic Catastrophe: Lipid Emulsion and Dantrolene
Anesthesiology 7 2007, Vol.107, 284. doi:10.1213/01.ane.0000261264.82003.d7
Anesthesiology 7 2007, Vol.107, 284. doi:10.1213/01.ane.0000261264.82003.d7
In Response:
We thank Drs. Picard, Meek, and Ward (1) for their interest in our paper (2) and their kind comments. We applaud physicians in the United Kingdom for developing consensus protocols for treatment of local anesthetic intoxication and regret that relevant specialty organizations in North America have not yet gone through the same process.
Cardiac toxicity from bupivacaine and similar compounds is every bit as much an “anesthetic disease” as malignant hyperthermia (MH). Moreover, local anesthetic cardiac toxicity may be significantly more common than MH. Therefore, it is surprising that we in the United States have protocols for the rarer disease and disappointing that we have not yet adopted a similar protocol for the more common potentially lethal problem.
Department of Anesthesiology
Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Medical Center Boulevard
Winston-Salem, NC
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis, IN
REFERENCES
Picard J, Meek T, Ward S. Antidotes to anesthetic catastrophe: lipid emulsion and dantrolene. Anesth Analg 2007;104:283–4.Picard, J Meek, T Ward, S
Corcoran W, Butterworth J, Weller RS, et al. Local anesthetic-induced cardiac toxicity: a survey of contemporary practice strategies among academic anesthesiology departments. Anesth Analg 2006;103:1322–6.Corcoran, W Butterworth, J Weller, RS et al.,