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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   February 2015
SPAR(klet) WARS: Erie’s Duncan et al. vs. Cleveland’s Hingson et al.
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   February 2015
SPAR(klet) WARS: Erie’s Duncan et al. vs. Cleveland’s Hingson et al.
Anesthesiology 2 2015, Vol.122, 386. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000459440.11386.26
Anesthesiology 2 2015, Vol.122, 386. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000459440.11386.26
“Sparklets” were small compressed gas cartridges that were popularized for medical use by a British physician in in the 1920s. From Erie, Pennsylvania, inventors James Duncan and Leo Trambley filed their U.S. Patent drawing (high left) from their “Oxygen dispensing device …” in May of 1955. As distributed by their hometown Controlled Precision, Inc., their “Oxy-Hale” device (low left) provided portable or field delivery of 3 liters of oxygen per exchangeable green sparklet (right). Advertised nationwide for oxygenating or resuscitating patients, the Oxy-Hale was even featured in the Anniston Star, the hometown newspaper of Alabama native, Robert Hingson, M.D. After arriving in Cleveland, Ohio—about 100 miles from Erie, Pennsylvania—Dr. Hingson had collaborated with inventors Frank Ziherl and Arthur Kish to file a patent for their own sparklet device. They filed almost 9 months before the Duncan–Trambley team but would not be granted the more complicated patent until 1960, nearly 20 months after the Erie team. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
“Sparklets” were small compressed gas cartridges that were popularized for medical use by a British physician in in the 1920s. From Erie, Pennsylvania, inventors James Duncan and Leo Trambley filed their U.S. Patent drawing (high left) from their “Oxygen dispensing device …” in May of 1955. As distributed by their hometown Controlled Precision, Inc., their “Oxy-Hale” device (low left) provided portable or field delivery of 3 liters of oxygen per exchangeable green sparklet (right). Advertised nationwide for oxygenating or resuscitating patients, the Oxy-Hale was even featured in the Anniston Star, the hometown newspaper of Alabama native, Robert Hingson, M.D. After arriving in Cleveland, Ohio—about 100 miles from Erie, Pennsylvania—Dr. Hingson had collaborated with inventors Frank Ziherl and Arthur Kish to file a patent for their own sparklet device. They filed almost 9 months before the Duncan–Trambley team but would not be granted the more complicated patent until 1960, nearly 20 months after the Erie team. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
“Sparklets” were small compressed gas cartridges that were popularized for medical use by a British physician in in the 1920s. From Erie, Pennsylvania, inventors James Duncan and Leo Trambley filed their U.S. Patent drawing (high left) from their “Oxygen dispensing device …” in May of 1955. As distributed by their hometown Controlled Precision, Inc., their “Oxy-Hale” device (low left) provided portable or field delivery of 3 liters of oxygen per exchangeable green sparklet (right). Advertised nationwide for oxygenating or resuscitating patients, the Oxy-Hale was even featured in the Anniston Star, the hometown newspaper of Alabama native, Robert Hingson, M.D. After arriving in Cleveland, Ohio—about 100 miles from Erie, Pennsylvania—Dr. Hingson had collaborated with inventors Frank Ziherl and Arthur Kish to file a patent for their own sparklet device. They filed almost 9 months before the Duncan–Trambley team but would not be granted the more complicated patent until 1960, nearly 20 months after the Erie team. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
“Sparklets” were small compressed gas cartridges that were popularized for medical use by a British physician in in the 1920s. From Erie, Pennsylvania, inventors James Duncan and Leo Trambley filed their U.S. Patent drawing (high left) from their “Oxygen dispensing device …” in May of 1955. As distributed by their hometown Controlled Precision, Inc., their “Oxy-Hale” device (low left) provided portable or field delivery of 3 liters of oxygen per exchangeable green sparklet (right). Advertised nationwide for oxygenating or resuscitating patients, the Oxy-Hale was even featured in the Anniston Star, the hometown newspaper of Alabama native, Robert Hingson, M.D. After arriving in Cleveland, Ohio—about 100 miles from Erie, Pennsylvania—Dr. Hingson had collaborated with inventors Frank Ziherl and Arthur Kish to file a patent for their own sparklet device. They filed almost 9 months before the Duncan–Trambley team but would not be granted the more complicated patent until 1960, nearly 20 months after the Erie team. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
“Sparklets” were small compressed gas cartridges that were popularized for medical use by a British physician in in the 1920s. From Erie, Pennsylvania, inventors James Duncan and Leo Trambley filed their U.S. Patent drawing (high left) from their “Oxygen dispensing device …” in May of 1955. As distributed by their hometown Controlled Precision, Inc., their “Oxy-Hale” device (low left) provided portable or field delivery of 3 liters of oxygen per exchangeable green sparklet (right). Advertised nationwide for oxygenating or resuscitating patients, the Oxy-Hale was even featured in the Anniston Star, the hometown newspaper of Alabama native, Robert Hingson, M.D. After arriving in Cleveland, Ohio—about 100 miles from Erie, Pennsylvania—Dr. Hingson had collaborated with inventors Frank Ziherl and Arthur Kish to file a patent for their own sparklet device. They filed almost 9 months before the Duncan–Trambley team but would not be granted the more complicated patent until 1960, nearly 20 months after the Erie team. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
“Sparklets” were small compressed gas cartridges that were popularized for medical use by a British physician in in the 1920s. From Erie, Pennsylvania, inventors James Duncan and Leo Trambley filed their U.S. Patent drawing (high left) from their “Oxygen dispensing device …” in May of 1955. As distributed by their hometown Controlled Precision, Inc., their “Oxy-Hale” device (low left) provided portable or field delivery of 3 liters of oxygen per exchangeable green sparklet (right). Advertised nationwide for oxygenating or resuscitating patients, the Oxy-Hale was even featured in the Anniston Star, the hometown newspaper of Alabama native, Robert Hingson, M.D. After arriving in Cleveland, Ohio—about 100 miles from Erie, Pennsylvania—Dr. Hingson had collaborated with inventors Frank Ziherl and Arthur Kish to file a patent for their own sparklet device. They filed almost 9 months before the Duncan–Trambley team but would not be granted the more complicated patent until 1960, nearly 20 months after the Erie team. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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