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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   February 2015
From Paris to Tunis: Bellon Advertising Xylocaine
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   February 2015
From Paris to Tunis: Bellon Advertising Xylocaine
Anesthesiology 2 2015, Vol.122, 324. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000459439.11386.1d
Anesthesiology 2 2015, Vol.122, 324. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000459439.11386.1d
From the Parisian suburb of Neuilly: the Roger Bellon Laboratory used a 4-Franc stamp to send this postcard advertising (low) “Xylocaïne/Anesthésie locale/Injections thérapeutiques.” From 33 miles southeast of Paris: the Palace of Fontainebleau, the royal or imperial residence of French leaders from King Louis VII to Napoleon III, was photographed (high) to grace the front of this postcard. From 922 miles southeast of Paris: the addressees of this postcard, the Doctors Coursieres, conducted their medical practice in Montfleury, a district in Tunis, the Tunisian capital. A French protectorate since 1881, Tunisia would gain its independence in 1956. Marketed after World War II, the local anesthetic Xylocaine remains popular to this day—at least in its generic form of lidocaine—in Tunisia and around the world. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
From the Parisian suburb of Neuilly: the Roger Bellon Laboratory used a 4-Franc stamp to send this postcard advertising (low) “Xylocaïne/Anesthésie locale/Injections thérapeutiques.” From 33 miles southeast of Paris: the Palace of Fontainebleau, the royal or imperial residence of French leaders from King Louis VII to Napoleon III, was photographed (high) to grace the front of this postcard. From 922 miles southeast of Paris: the addressees of this postcard, the Doctors Coursieres, conducted their medical practice in Montfleury, a district in Tunis, the Tunisian capital. A French protectorate since 1881, Tunisia would gain its independence in 1956. Marketed after World War II, the local anesthetic Xylocaine remains popular to this day—at least in its generic form of lidocaine—in Tunisia and around the world. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
From the Parisian suburb of Neuilly: the Roger Bellon Laboratory used a 4-Franc stamp to send this postcard advertising (low) “Xylocaïne/Anesthésie locale/Injections thérapeutiques.” From 33 miles southeast of Paris: the Palace of Fontainebleau, the royal or imperial residence of French leaders from King Louis VII to Napoleon III, was photographed (high) to grace the front of this postcard. From 922 miles southeast of Paris: the addressees of this postcard, the Doctors Coursieres, conducted their medical practice in Montfleury, a district in Tunis, the Tunisian capital. A French protectorate since 1881, Tunisia would gain its independence in 1956. Marketed after World War II, the local anesthetic Xylocaine remains popular to this day—at least in its generic form of lidocaine—in Tunisia and around the world. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
From the Parisian suburb of Neuilly: the Roger Bellon Laboratory used a 4-Franc stamp to send this postcard advertising (low) “Xylocaïne/Anesthésie locale/Injections thérapeutiques.” From 33 miles southeast of Paris: the Palace of Fontainebleau, the royal or imperial residence of French leaders from King Louis VII to Napoleon III, was photographed (high) to grace the front of this postcard. From 922 miles southeast of Paris: the addressees of this postcard, the Doctors Coursieres, conducted their medical practice in Montfleury, a district in Tunis, the Tunisian capital. A French protectorate since 1881, Tunisia would gain its independence in 1956. Marketed after World War II, the local anesthetic Xylocaine remains popular to this day—at least in its generic form of lidocaine—in Tunisia and around the world. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
From the Parisian suburb of Neuilly: the Roger Bellon Laboratory used a 4-Franc stamp to send this postcard advertising (low) “Xylocaïne/Anesthésie locale/Injections thérapeutiques.” From 33 miles southeast of Paris: the Palace of Fontainebleau, the royal or imperial residence of French leaders from King Louis VII to Napoleon III, was photographed (high) to grace the front of this postcard. From 922 miles southeast of Paris: the addressees of this postcard, the Doctors Coursieres, conducted their medical practice in Montfleury, a district in Tunis, the Tunisian capital. A French protectorate since 1881, Tunisia would gain its independence in 1956. Marketed after World War II, the local anesthetic Xylocaine remains popular to this day—at least in its generic form of lidocaine—in Tunisia and around the world. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
From the Parisian suburb of Neuilly: the Roger Bellon Laboratory used a 4-Franc stamp to send this postcard advertising (low) “Xylocaïne/Anesthésie locale/Injections thérapeutiques.” From 33 miles southeast of Paris: the Palace of Fontainebleau, the royal or imperial residence of French leaders from King Louis VII to Napoleon III, was photographed (high) to grace the front of this postcard. From 922 miles southeast of Paris: the addressees of this postcard, the Doctors Coursieres, conducted their medical practice in Montfleury, a district in Tunis, the Tunisian capital. A French protectorate since 1881, Tunisia would gain its independence in 1956. Marketed after World War II, the local anesthetic Xylocaine remains popular to this day—at least in its generic form of lidocaine—in Tunisia and around the world. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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