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Infographics in Anesthesiology  |   February 2015
Intraoperative Temperature Management Means More than Being Warm at the End of the Case
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan P. Wanderer
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
  • James P. Rathmell
    Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • Illustration by Annemarie Johnson, Vivo Visuals.
    Illustration by Annemarie Johnson, Vivo Visuals.×
  • Address correspondence to Dr. Wanderer: jon.wanderer@vanderbilt.edu.
Article Information
Infographics in Anesthesiology / Cardiovascular Anesthesia / Coagulation and Transfusion / Regional Anesthesia
Infographics in Anesthesiology   |   February 2015
Intraoperative Temperature Management Means More than Being Warm at the End of the Case
Anesthesiology 2 2015, Vol.122, A23. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000459438.03762.ee
Anesthesiology 2 2015, Vol.122, A23. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000459438.03762.ee
Complex Information for Anesthesiologists Presented Quickly and Clearly
The current end-of-case perioperative temperature management metric is defined as the “percentage of patients … under general or neuraxial anesthesia of 60 minutes duration or longer, except patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass, for whom either active warming was used intraoperatively for the purpose of maintaining normothermia, or at least one body temperature equal to or greater than 36 degrees Centigrade (or 96.8 degrees Fahrenheit) was recorded within the 30 minutes immediately before or the 15 minutes immediately after anesthesia end time.”*01  The historical performance on this metric was extracted from the most recent Physician Quality Report System report†02  from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for the 10,595 eligible providers where 3 yr of measurement data were available. The adjusted odds ratios for intraoperative erythrocyte transfusion were extracted directly from a recent analysis of intraoperative core temperature patterns,1 and are displayed with error bars indicating the 95% confidence intervals.
Infographic created by Jonathan P. Wanderer, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, and James P. Rathmell, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Illustration by Annemarie Johnson, Vivo Visuals. Address correspondence to Dr. Wanderer: jon.wanderer@vanderbilt.edu.
*National Quality Measures Clearinghouse, Perioperative Temperature Management (National Quality Forum Metric 0454, Physician Quality Reporting System Metric 193). Available at: http://www.qualitymeasures.ahrq.gov/hhs/content.aspx?id=44190. Accessed November 25, 2014.
National Quality Measures Clearinghouse, Perioperative Temperature Management (National Quality Forum Metric 0454, Physician Quality Reporting System Metric 193). Available at: http://www.qualitymeasures.ahrq.gov/hhs/content.aspx?id=44190. Accessed November 25, 2014.×
Physician Quality Reporting System and Electronic Prescribing (eRx) Incentive Program 2012 Reporting Experience Including Trends (2009–2013) Appendix. Available at: http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Quality-Initiatives-Patient-Assessment-Instruments/PQRS/Downloads/2012-PQRS-and-eRx-Experience-Report.zip. Accessed November 25, 2014.
Physician Quality Reporting System and Electronic Prescribing (eRx) Incentive Program 2012 Reporting Experience Including Trends (2009–2013) Appendix. Available at: http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Quality-Initiatives-Patient-Assessment-Instruments/PQRS/Downloads/2012-PQRS-and-eRx-Experience-Report.zip. Accessed November 25, 2014.×
Sun, Z, Honar, H, Sessler, DI, Dalton, JE, Yang, D, Panjasawatwong, K, Deroee, AF, Salmasi, V, Saager, L, Kurz, A Intraoperative core temperature patterns, transfusion requirement, and hospital duration in patients warmed with forced air.. Anesthesiology. (2015). 122 276–85 [Article] [PubMed]