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Correspondence  |   November 1996
Reply: Anaphylactoid Reactions to Protamine
Author Notes
  • Department of Anesthesiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita City, Osaka 565, Japan.
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   November 1996
Reply: Anaphylactoid Reactions to Protamine
Anesthesiology 11 1996, Vol.85, 1210. doi:
Anesthesiology 11 1996, Vol.85, 1210. doi:
In Reply:-As Kindler and Bircher correctly point out, immunoglobulin E and immunoglobulin G antibodies to protamine were not measured, and, therefore, the precise mechanism underlying our observations remains uncertain. Although I did not have control subjects, I do not think the protamine with concentrations between 10 and 100 micro gram/ml used in our report induced irritative skin responses. Weiler et al. [1] reported that out of 85 patients who were skin tested with 0.001-0.1 mg/ml protamine, only 3 were positive, and the protamine concentration at which these 3 patients showed positive reactions was 0.1 mg/ml.
Makoto Takenoshita, M.D., Department of Anesthesiology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita City, Osaka 565, Japan.
(Accepted for publication August 6, 1996.)
REFERENCE
REFERENCE
Weiler JM, Gellhaus MA, Carter JG, Meng RL, Benson PM, Hottel RA, Schillig KB, Vegh AB, Clarke WR: A prospective study of the risk of an immediate adverse reaction to protamine sulfate during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1990; 85:713-9.