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Correspondence  |   December 1998
Value of Presenting the Time-course of Pain Relief in Analgesic Trials 
Author Notes
  • Assistant Professor, Research (Goudas)
  • Saltonstall Professor of Pain Research; Department of Anesthesia; New England Medical Center; Boston, Massachusetts (Carr);
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   December 1998
Value of Presenting the Time-course of Pain Relief in Analgesic Trials 
Anesthesiology 12 1998, Vol.89, 1602. doi:
Anesthesiology 12 1998, Vol.89, 1602. doi:
To the Editor:-We read with great interest the study by Gautier et al. [1] in the March issue of Anesthesiology. Clinical trials to evaluate the interactions of analgesics at the spinal cord level are very important. Gautier et al. present only the maximum pain relief score, the time at which this occurred, and the duration of adequate analgesia (i.e., time to first analgesic request after intrathecal injection). However, two agents that share these three parameters may not be equally effective (as illustrated in Figure 1using hypothetical data). A similar comprehensive description of side effects may be useful in analyzing their incidence and severity. Furthermore, such analysis may provide useful information on possible synergistic or additive interactions between sufentanil and clonidine in this particular clinical setting.
Figure 1. Pain relief scores for two drugs, “A”([black circle]) and “B”([white circle]). Both drugs have identical onset, peak effect, and duration of action until supplemental analgesia is needed. Note, however, different areas under the curve (AUC) of pain relief above threshold versus time.
Figure 1. Pain relief scores for two drugs, “A”([black circle]) and “B”([white circle]). Both drugs have identical onset, peak effect, and duration of action until supplemental analgesia is needed. Note, however, different areas under the curve (AUC) of pain relief above threshold versus time.
Figure 1. Pain relief scores for two drugs, “A”([black circle]) and “B”([white circle]). Both drugs have identical onset, peak effect, and duration of action until supplemental analgesia is needed. Note, however, different areas under the curve (AUC) of pain relief above threshold versus time.
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Leonidas C. Goudas, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Research
Daniel B. Carr, M.D., F.A.B.P.M.
Saltonstall Professor of Pain Research; Department of Anesthesia; New England Medical Center; Boston, Massachusetts;
(Accepted for publication August 6, 1998.)
REFERENCES
Gautier PE, De Kock M, Fanard L, Van Steenberge A, Hody J-L: Intrathecal clonidine combined with sufentanil for labor analgesia. Anesthesiology 1998; 88:651-6
Figure 1. Pain relief scores for two drugs, “A”([black circle]) and “B”([white circle]). Both drugs have identical onset, peak effect, and duration of action until supplemental analgesia is needed. Note, however, different areas under the curve (AUC) of pain relief above threshold versus time.
Figure 1. Pain relief scores for two drugs, “A”([black circle]) and “B”([white circle]). Both drugs have identical onset, peak effect, and duration of action until supplemental analgesia is needed. Note, however, different areas under the curve (AUC) of pain relief above threshold versus time.
Figure 1. Pain relief scores for two drugs, “A”([black circle]) and “B”([white circle]). Both drugs have identical onset, peak effect, and duration of action until supplemental analgesia is needed. Note, however, different areas under the curve (AUC) of pain relief above threshold versus time.
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