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Correspondence  |   February 2000
Security System for Transducer Holders
Author Notes
  • Clinical Assistant Professor
  • Department of Anesthesiology
  • Mount Sinai Medical Center
  • One Gustave L. Levy Place
  • New York, New York 10029-6574
  • Janet_Pittman_at_anesthet_post@smtplink.mssm.edu
  • Clinical Perfusionist
  • Regional Health Care Center 11th Street Surgical Center
  • Wichita Falls, Texas
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   February 2000
Security System for Transducer Holders
Anesthesiology 2 2000, Vol.92, 631. doi:
Anesthesiology 2 2000, Vol.92, 631. doi:
To the Editor:—
Loss of transducer holders for invasive pressure monitoring to the postanesthesia care unit or intensive care unit is a frequent occurrence in our institution. We have developed the following solution to this problem. With the transducer holder attached to an intravenous pole, the small black screws securing the transducer holder to its mounting clamp are removed and replaced with set screws (size and thread:#10-32, 3/8 in long), thus preventing separation of the transducer holder from its support bracket. A hexagonal (Allen) wrench (3/32 in) is used to tighten the set screws.
Nylon-coated cable (3/16-in diameter) is threaded circumferentially around the intravenous pole and through the transducer support (fig. 1),
Fig. 1. Lateral view showing loop–sleeve connector and cable assembly securing transducer holder and mounting clamp to intravenous pole.
Fig. 1. Lateral view showing loop–sleeve connector and cable assembly securing transducer holder and mounting clamp to intravenous pole.
Fig. 1. Lateral view showing loop–sleeve connector and cable assembly securing transducer holder and mounting clamp to intravenous pole.
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and is crimped using a loop/sleeve connector and Vise-Grips (Pedersen Manufacturing Co., De Witt, NE), or a crimping tool. (All items are available through the catalog from Small Parts, Inc., Miami Lakes, FL)
The arrangement described prevents removal of the transducer holder from the intravenous pole while allowing vertical movement of the transducer to accommodate different operating room table heights.
Fig. 1. Lateral view showing loop–sleeve connector and cable assembly securing transducer holder and mounting clamp to intravenous pole.
Fig. 1. Lateral view showing loop–sleeve connector and cable assembly securing transducer holder and mounting clamp to intravenous pole.
Fig. 1. Lateral view showing loop–sleeve connector and cable assembly securing transducer holder and mounting clamp to intravenous pole.
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