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Correspondence  |   May 2000
A Linguistic Crisis? Maybe. A Linguistic Crises? Definitely Not!
Author Notes
  • Senior Attending Anesthesiologist
  • Department of Anesthesiology
  • Riverside/Grant Hospitals
  • Columbus, Ohio
  • jinxed@columbus.rr.com
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   May 2000
A Linguistic Crisis? Maybe. A Linguistic Crises? Definitely Not!
Anesthesiology 5 2000, Vol.92, 1505. doi:
Anesthesiology 5 2000, Vol.92, 1505. doi:
To the Editor:—
Anatomically speaking, physicians often use the more “proper” Latin names instead of the more common lay terms. If one chooses the former, care must be taken to do so correctly.
In an otherwise clear and informative case report, the authors referred to the “left nares” and the “right nares” of a nasally intubated patient. Unless the patient in question had four or more nostrils, this usage was incorrect. One naris plus another naris makes two nares.