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Correspondence  |   November 2000
Preemptive Analgesia: What Does It Really Mean?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Philippe Duvaldestin, M.D.
    *
  • *Hôpital Henri Mondor, Creteil, France.
  • philippe.duvaldestin@hmn.ap-hop-paris.fr
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   November 2000
Preemptive Analgesia: What Does It Really Mean?
Anesthesiology 11 2000, Vol.93, 1368. doi:
Anesthesiology 11 2000, Vol.93, 1368. doi:
In Reply:—
Dr. Hepner rightly calls attention to the misuse of the word “preemptive.” In our study,1 we suggested in the title that morphine-6-glucuronide (M-6-G) lacks preemptive analgesic effect. From a semantic point of view, we agree with Dr. Hepner’s comment because M-6-G was administered after the start of surgery. Nevertheless, we stress that most anesthesiologists use central analgesics in combination with intravenous general anesthetics at induction of anesthesia. Thus, in our routine practice, preemptive analgesia is commonly used without deliberate intention.
References
Motamed C, Mazoit X, Ghanouchi K, Guirimand F, Abhay K, Lieutaud T, Bensaid S, Fernandez C, Duvaldestin P: Preemptive intravenous morphine-6-glucuronide is ineffective for postoperative pain relief. ANESTHESIOLOGY 2000; 92:355–60Motamed, C Mazoit, X Ghanouchi, K Guirimand, F Abhay, K Lieutaud, T Bensaid, S Fernandez, C Duvaldestin, P