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Correspondence  |   September 2001
Opening Anesthesiologist-proof Vials
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yitzhak Cohen, M.D.
    *
  • *Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel. yico@barak-online.net
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   September 2001
Opening Anesthesiologist-proof Vials
Anesthesiology 9 2001, Vol.95, 814. doi:
Anesthesiology 9 2001, Vol.95, 814. doi:
To the Editor:—
Leighton and Mitchell 1 describe methods for opening non–flip-top vials using sharp objects, such as a screwdriver, a ball pen, or a hemostat. We suggest an even better way for opening such vials by pushing hard on the cap center with a small, nonsharp object, such as the tip of a syringe, a hemostat, or even a shelf’s sharp edge (fig. 1). This prevents the need for the exact insertion of the sharp object into the gap between the cap and its center.
Fig. 1. Opening of a non–flip-top vial by pushing hard on the center of the vial’s cap with a syringe.
Fig. 1. Opening of a non–flip-top vial by pushing hard on the center of the vial’s cap with a syringe.
Fig. 1. Opening of a non–flip-top vial by pushing hard on the center of the vial’s cap with a syringe.
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Although we were unable to obtain dantrolene bottles, we tested this method on 25 outdated non–flip-top vials. All were opened easily within less than 2 s. Use of this method will allow faster opening of vials and will prevent injury in an emergency.
Reference
Reference
Leighton BL, Mitchell LW: Dantrolene: Opening the anesthesiologist-proof vial. A nesthesiology 2001; 94: 379–80Leighton, BL Mitchell, LW
Fig. 1. Opening of a non–flip-top vial by pushing hard on the center of the vial’s cap with a syringe.
Fig. 1. Opening of a non–flip-top vial by pushing hard on the center of the vial’s cap with a syringe.
Fig. 1. Opening of a non–flip-top vial by pushing hard on the center of the vial’s cap with a syringe.
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