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Correspondence  |   March 2003
Does Vasopressin Infusion Improve the Outcome of Severe Septic-Shock without any Adverse Effects?: In Reply:—
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Keith R. Walley, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C)
    *
  • McDonald Research Laboratories/The iCAPTURE Centre, Providence Health Care, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   March 2003
Does Vasopressin Infusion Improve the Outcome of Severe Septic-Shock without any Adverse Effects?: In Reply:—
Anesthesiology 3 2003, Vol.98, 793. doi:
Anesthesiology 3 2003, Vol.98, 793. doi:
We agree with Dr. Iijima et al.  who reemphasize that our study of a short-term vasopressin infusion in patients with severe septic shock does not address the key issue of survival. Furthermore, they point out that longer duration infusions may be associated with potentially adverse effects. Our current study was not designed to address survival. Nevertheless, we found that 1 of 11 patients who received norepinephrine infusion survived to hospital discharge while 5 of 13 patients who received vasopressin infusion survived. We think that the results of our 4 h study are not sufficient by themselves to advocate the use of vasopressin in patients with severe septic shock. A properly powered, randomized, controlled trial with an important primary end-point, such as survival, is required.