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Correspondence  |   February 2010
What about the Surgery?
Author Notes
  • The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   February 2010
What about the Surgery?
Anesthesiology 2 2010, Vol.112, 502. doi:10.1097/ALN.0b013e3181cb4954
Anesthesiology 2 2010, Vol.112, 502. doi:10.1097/ALN.0b013e3181cb4954
In Reply:
Dr. Barak is of course correct that surgery and anesthesia have advanced during the past two decades; for that matter, nursing care has also improved. However, as mentioned in my editorial,1 now we also care for much sicker patients than in previous years.
The extent to which various factors contribute to improved perioperative outcomes remains unclear and will presumably never be accurately proportioned. Assigning credit (or blame) is less important than recognizing that our management decisions may influence long-term outcomes.
The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
Reference
Reference
Sessler DI: Long-term consequences of anesthetic management (editorial). Anesthesiology 2009; 111:1–4Sessler, DI