Free
Correspondence  |   October 2009
Wren, Boyle, and the Origins of Intravenous Injections and the Royal Society of London
Author Notes
  • Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. (Bause)
Article Information
Correspondence
Correspondence   |   October 2009
Wren, Boyle, and the Origins of Intravenous Injections and the Royal Society of London
Anesthesiology 10 2009, Vol.111, 924. doi:10.1097/ALN.0b013e3181b56d6f
Anesthesiology 10 2009, Vol.111, 924. doi:10.1097/ALN.0b013e3181b56d6f
In Reply:—
I thank Professor Jorge Dagnino, M.D., for his chronology of the founding of the Royal Society. With my six-sentence limitation on caption space for Anesthesiology Reflections  , I thought that I had dealt reasonably with the Royal Society’s nebulous origins by writing that Wren, Boyle, and others had met “by” (not “first met”) in November of 1660.
Just as I acknowledged 21 yr ago, Wren was the “brains” behind the intravenous goose quill experiment of 1656.1 So I concur with Professor Dagnino on these facts. In “Boyle, a Most Skeptical Chemist,” the 1659 date in the caption was my typographical error.2 
My thanks to Professor Dagnino for his thoughtful feedback on my telegraphic captions.
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
References
Bause GS: An historical backdrop to cardiovascular monitoring. Anesth Clin N Am 1988; 6:672Bause, GS
Bause GS: Boyle, a most skeptical chemist. Anesthesiology 2009; 110:610Bause, GS