Free
Anesthesiology CME Program  |   May 2008
Instructions for Obtaining Journal CME Credit
Article Information
Anesthesiology CME Program
Anesthesiology CME Program   |   May 2008
Instructions for Obtaining Journal CME Credit
Anesthesiology 5 2008, Vol.108, 971-972. doi:10.1097/ALN.0b013e318178dc99
Anesthesiology 5 2008, Vol.108, 971-972. doi:10.1097/ALN.0b013e318178dc99
Anesthesiology's journal-based CME program is open to all readers. Members of the American Society of Anesthesiologists participate at a preferred rate, but you need not be an ASA member or a journal subscriber to take part in this CME activity. Please complete the following steps:
  1. Read the article by the ASA Task Force entitled “Practice advisory for the prevention and management of operating room fires: A report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Operating Room Fires” on page 786 of this issue.

  2. Review the questions and other required information for CME program completion (published in both the print and online journal).

  3. When ready, go to the CME Web site: . Submit your answers, form of payment, and other required information by December 31 of the year following the year of publication.

The American Society of Anesthesiologists is approved by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to sponsor continuing medical education programs for physicians.
The American Society of Anesthesiologists designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™  . Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
Purpose:  The focus of the journal-based CME program, and the articles chosen for the program, is to educate readers on current developments in the science and clinical practice of the specialty of Anesthesiology.
Target Audience:  Physicians and other medical professionals whose medical specialty is the practice of anesthesia.
Learning Objectives:  After reading this article, participants should understand how to reduce the risk of and respond to operating room fires.
Disclosure Information:
Authors  – The American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Operating Room Fires
Grants or research support:  None
Consultantships or honoraria:  None
Each Task Force committee member has a Conflict of Interest statement on file at the Headquarters Office of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. This Practice Advisory was supported by the American Society of Anesthesiologists.
Question Writers  – Leslie C. Jameson, M.D., and Richard P. Dutton, M.D., M.B.A.
Drs. Jameson and Dutton have no grants, research support, or consultant positions, nor do they receive any honoraria from outside sources, which may create conflicts of interest concerning this CME program.
Article Questions
Based on the article by the ASA Task Force entitled “Practice advisory for the prevention and management of operating room fires: A report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Operating Room Fires” in the May issue of Anesthesiology, choose the one correct answer for each question:
1. Which of the following statements regarding American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) practice advisories is most  likely true?
A. They are intended as requirements for the safe practice of anesthesiology.
B. They are not based on ASA members’ opinion.
C. They summarize the state of the literature.
D. They rarely need revision.
2. A fire requires the presence of three components: an oxidizer, an ignition source, and a fuel. Which of the following is least  likely to contribute to an operating room fire?
A. Gastrointestinal tract gases
B. Room air
C. Argon beam coagulators
D. Nitrous oxide
3. Which of the following is most  helpful in preventing an operating room fire?
A. Identifying surgical procedures as high risk for fire
B. Configuring drapes to keep oxidizers under  the drapes
C. Using dry sponges or gauze during the procedure
D. Applying alcohol skin prep immediately before an electrocautery incision
4. Which of the following statements about a fire in the airway is most  likely true?
A. An early warning sign includes an unusual odor.
B. The tracheal tube should remain in the airway.
C. Oxygen delivery should be increased to prevent hypoxia.
D. The patient's airway should be flooded with carbon dioxide.
5. All of the following constitute a high risk for an operating room fire except 
A. Placing an uncuffed tracheal tube
B. Head and neck surgery
C. Using a laryngeal mask airway during deep sedation in an oxygen-dependent patient
D. Using electrocautery during a tracheostomy
6. In the event an operating room fire cannot be extinguished with saline, the best  response is to
A. Use additional drapes to smother the fire
B. Let the fire consume the fuel
C. Turn off the medical gas supplies to the room prior to evacuation
D. Use a CO2fire extinguisher on the area