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Anesthesiology CME Program  |   July 2006
Instructions for Obtaining Journal CME Credit
Article Information
Anesthesiology CME Program
Anesthesiology CME Program   |   July 2006
Instructions for Obtaining Journal CME Credit
Anesthesiology 7 2006, Vol.105, 231-232. doi:
Anesthesiology 7 2006, Vol.105, 231-232. doi:
Anesthesiology’s journal-based CME program is open to all readers. Members of the American Society of Anesthesiologists participate at a preferred rate, but you need not be an ASA member or a journal subscriber to take part in this CME activity. Please complete the following steps:
  1. Read the article by Reich et al.  entitled “Development of a module for point-of-care charge capture and submission using an anesthesia information management system” on page 179 and the accompanying editorial by Abouleish and Conlay entitled “Automated anesthesia charge capture and submission: Wave of the future, or bridge to nowhere?” on page 5 of this issue.

  2. Review the questions and other required information for CME program completion (published in both the print and online journal).

  3. When ready, go to the CME Web site: . Submit your answers, form of payment, and other required information by December 31 of the year following the year of publication.

The American Society of Anesthesiologists is approved by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to sponsor continuing medical education programs for physicians.
The American Society of Anesthesiologists designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit  ™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
Purpose:  The focus of the journal-based CME program, and the articles chosen for the program, is to educate readers on current developments in the science and clinical practice of the specialty of Anesthesiology.
Target Audience:  Physicians and other medical professionals whose medical specialty is the practice of anesthesia.
Learning Objectives:  After reading the articles, participants should have a better understanding of anesthesia information management systems, including their utility and limitations.
Disclosure Information:
Authors  –Amr E. Abouleish, M.D., M.B.A., and Lydia Conlay, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A.
Grants or research support:  None
Consultantships or honoraria:  None
The article authored by Drs. Abouleish and Conlay was supported solely from institutional and/or departmental sources.
Authors  –David L. Reich, M.D., Ronald A. Kahn, M.D., David Wax, M.D., Tanuj Palvia, B.S., Maria Galati, M.B.A., and Marina Krol, Ph.D.
Grants or research support:  None
Consultantships or honoraria:  None
The article authored by Drs. Reich, Kahn, Wax, Palvia, Galati, and Krol was supported solely from institutional and/or departmental sources.
Question Writer  –Peter L. Bailey, M.D.
Dr. Bailey has no grants, research support, or consultant positions, nor does he receive any honoraria from outside sources, which may create conflicts of interest concerning this CME program.
Article Questions
Based on the article by Reich et al.  entitled “Development of a module for point-of-care charge capture and submission using an anesthesia information management system”and its accompanying editorial by Abouleish and Conlay entitled “Automated anesthesia charge capture and submission: Wave of the future, or bridge to nowhere?”in the July issue of Anesthesiology, choose the one correct answer for each question:
1. Which of the following statements concerning electronic medical record systems is most  likely true?
A. They are most commonly acquired to make billing more efficient.
B. Charge capture and submission cannot be adequately made with current electronic medical record keeping systems.
C. Only a minority of physicians use them for point-of-care charge capture and submission.
D. Currently, “off-the-shelf” products allow easy integration into other existing electronic information systems.
2. Which one of the following statements concerning the anesthesia information management system (AIMS)–generated anesthesia electronic medical record and electronic billing is most  likely true?
A. Payment can be expedited.
B. Transmission of data to billing companies is currently prohibited.
C. Data acquisition requires manual input.
D. Concurrency of multiple procedures cannot be managed.
3. Which one of the following statements concerning problems related to manual billing processes is most  likely true?
A. Errors are rare.
B. Incomplete charges are rare.
C. Potential revenue losses are not significant.
D. Claims which require reprocessing are costly.
4. Which of the following statements about the anesthesia information management system (AIMS)–generated electronic anesthesia record compared to manual record keeping is most  likely true?
A. Recording of physiological variables is more prone to error.
B. Medicolegal risk is increased.
C. Physicians exposed to both methods prefer electronic anesthesia record keeping.
D. It is more time consuming.
5. Which of the following best  explains the low market penetration of electronic anesthesia record keeping systems?
A. They require significant up-front capital expenditure and investment.
B. They hinder managed care negotiations.
C. They hamper regulatory compliance.
D. Billing losses over time exceed those of manual billing.