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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   September 2014
Wood, Camphor, and an Antidote for Avertin Overdoses
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   September 2014
Wood, Camphor, and an Antidote for Avertin Overdoses
Anesthesiology 09 2014, Vol.121, 643. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000452348.78804.52
Anesthesiology 09 2014, Vol.121, 643. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000452348.78804.52
When Wood Library-Museum Founder Paul Meyer Wood began searching for ways to reverse the depressing effects of the rectally administered basal anesthetic Avertin (tribromoethanol), one of many antidotes that he investigated was Camphor. Traditionally considered a cardiac and respiratory stimulant, Camphor could be supplied in an oily solution for either intramuscular or subcutaneous administration. The 1cc ampoule depicted (above) was manufactured by Detroit’s Parke, Davis & Company. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
When Wood Library-Museum Founder Paul Meyer Wood began searching for ways to reverse the depressing effects of the rectally administered basal anesthetic Avertin (tribromoethanol), one of many antidotes that he investigated was Camphor. Traditionally considered a cardiac and respiratory stimulant, Camphor could be supplied in an oily solution for either intramuscular or subcutaneous administration. The 1cc ampoule depicted (above) was manufactured by Detroit’s Parke, Davis & Company. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
When Wood Library-Museum Founder Paul Meyer Wood began searching for ways to reverse the depressing effects of the rectally administered basal anesthetic Avertin (tribromoethanol), one of many antidotes that he investigated was Camphor. Traditionally considered a cardiac and respiratory stimulant, Camphor could be supplied in an oily solution for either intramuscular or subcutaneous administration. The 1cc ampoule depicted (above) was manufactured by Detroit’s Parke, Davis & Company. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
When Wood Library-Museum Founder Paul Meyer Wood began searching for ways to reverse the depressing effects of the rectally administered basal anesthetic Avertin (tribromoethanol), one of many antidotes that he investigated was Camphor. Traditionally considered a cardiac and respiratory stimulant, Camphor could be supplied in an oily solution for either intramuscular or subcutaneous administration. The 1cc ampoule depicted (above) was manufactured by Detroit’s Parke, Davis & Company. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
When Wood Library-Museum Founder Paul Meyer Wood began searching for ways to reverse the depressing effects of the rectally administered basal anesthetic Avertin (tribromoethanol), one of many antidotes that he investigated was Camphor. Traditionally considered a cardiac and respiratory stimulant, Camphor could be supplied in an oily solution for either intramuscular or subcutaneous administration. The 1cc ampoule depicted (above) was manufactured by Detroit’s Parke, Davis & Company. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
When Wood Library-Museum Founder Paul Meyer Wood began searching for ways to reverse the depressing effects of the rectally administered basal anesthetic Avertin (tribromoethanol), one of many antidotes that he investigated was Camphor. Traditionally considered a cardiac and respiratory stimulant, Camphor could be supplied in an oily solution for either intramuscular or subcutaneous administration. The 1cc ampoule depicted (above) was manufactured by Detroit’s Parke, Davis & Company. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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