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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   February 2013
G.B. Snow’s Inhaler or Chloroform Mixer
Author Affiliations
  • George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H.
    Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Park Ridge, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Article Information
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   February 2013
G.B. Snow’s Inhaler or Chloroform Mixer
Anesthesiology 02 2013, Vol.118, 250. doi:10.1097/ALN.0b013e3182867a20
Anesthesiology 02 2013, Vol.118, 250. doi:10.1097/ALN.0b013e3182867a20
In December of 1884, George B. Snow of Buffalo, New York, filed a patent application for his “inhaler” with its “capillary feeder leading from the [chloroform] reservoir below to the [nitrous oxide] inhaling-tube above”— from B to A in two of the filed diagrams (left). Snow’s filing was granted U.S. Patent No. 312771 in February of 1885, and he assigned patent rights to the Buffalo Dental Manufacturing Company. Within two months that company was advertising Snow’s innovation in the Dental Advertiser as a “Chloroform Mixer for Attachment to Nitrous Oxide Apparatus” (right). (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)