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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   January 2014
Professor Ralph Waters’ Hickman Medal
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   January 2014
Professor Ralph Waters’ Hickman Medal
Anesthesiology 01 2014, Vol.120, 159. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000440943.10441.1c
Anesthesiology 01 2014, Vol.120, 159. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000440943.10441.1c
In London in April of 1944, the Royal Society of Medicine awarded its fourth Hickman Medal, to Professor Ralph M. Waters of the University of Wisconsin. Waters had founded one of the world’s premiere academic departments of anesthesiology. His Hickman Medal features the visage of carbon dioxide’s “suspended animation” pioneer, Henry Hill Hickman, on the obverse (high right) and the female form of “Anaesthesia, Victrix Dolorum” on the reverse. Ironically, Hickman was famous clinically for using carbon dioxide; Waters, for removing it. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In London in April of 1944, the Royal Society of Medicine awarded its fourth Hickman Medal, to Professor Ralph M. Waters of the University of Wisconsin. Waters had founded one of the world’s premiere academic departments of anesthesiology. His Hickman Medal features the visage of carbon dioxide’s “suspended animation” pioneer, Henry Hill Hickman, on the obverse (high right) and the female form of “Anaesthesia, Victrix Dolorum” on the reverse. Ironically, Hickman was famous clinically for using carbon dioxide; Waters, for removing it. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In London in April of 1944, the Royal Society of Medicine awarded its fourth Hickman Medal, to Professor Ralph M. Waters of the University of Wisconsin. Waters had founded one of the world’s premiere academic departments of anesthesiology. His Hickman Medal features the visage of carbon dioxide’s “suspended animation” pioneer, Henry Hill Hickman, on the obverse (high right) and the female form of “Anaesthesia, Victrix Dolorum” on the reverse. Ironically, Hickman was famous clinically for using carbon dioxide; Waters, for removing it. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Park Ridge, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
In London in April of 1944, the Royal Society of Medicine awarded its fourth Hickman Medal, to Professor Ralph M. Waters of the University of Wisconsin. Waters had founded one of the world’s premiere academic departments of anesthesiology. His Hickman Medal features the visage of carbon dioxide’s “suspended animation” pioneer, Henry Hill Hickman, on the obverse (high right) and the female form of “Anaesthesia, Victrix Dolorum” on the reverse. Ironically, Hickman was famous clinically for using carbon dioxide; Waters, for removing it. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In London in April of 1944, the Royal Society of Medicine awarded its fourth Hickman Medal, to Professor Ralph M. Waters of the University of Wisconsin. Waters had founded one of the world’s premiere academic departments of anesthesiology. His Hickman Medal features the visage of carbon dioxide’s “suspended animation” pioneer, Henry Hill Hickman, on the obverse (high right) and the female form of “Anaesthesia, Victrix Dolorum” on the reverse. Ironically, Hickman was famous clinically for using carbon dioxide; Waters, for removing it. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
In London in April of 1944, the Royal Society of Medicine awarded its fourth Hickman Medal, to Professor Ralph M. Waters of the University of Wisconsin. Waters had founded one of the world’s premiere academic departments of anesthesiology. His Hickman Medal features the visage of carbon dioxide’s “suspended animation” pioneer, Henry Hill Hickman, on the obverse (high right) and the female form of “Anaesthesia, Victrix Dolorum” on the reverse. Ironically, Hickman was famous clinically for using carbon dioxide; Waters, for removing it. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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