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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   January 2014
An 1869 Engraving of the Ether Monument
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   January 2014
An 1869 Engraving of the Ether Monument
Anesthesiology 01 2014, Vol.120, 9. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000440942.72322.1b
Anesthesiology 01 2014, Vol.120, 9. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000440942.72322.1b
On June 12, 1869, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper published an engraving (left) of “The Ether Monument, in the Public Garden, Boston, Mass.” According to Leslie’s, the engraving was taken “From a Photograph by Whipple.” The “Ether Monument” would soon be nicknamed the “Either Monument” since either Bostonian, Dr. William T.G. Morton or Dr. Charles T. Jackson, could be hailed as the discoverer of anesthesia. From outside Boston, other priority claims were pressed for Drs. Horace Wells of Hartford, Connecticut, and Crawford W. Long of Jefferson, Georgia. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
On June 12, 1869, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper published an engraving (left) of “The Ether Monument, in the Public Garden, Boston, Mass.” According to Leslie’s, the engraving was taken “From a Photograph by Whipple.” The “Ether Monument” would soon be nicknamed the “Either Monument” since either Bostonian, Dr. William T.G. Morton or Dr. Charles T. Jackson, could be hailed as the discoverer of anesthesia. From outside Boston, other priority claims were pressed for Drs. Horace Wells of Hartford, Connecticut, and Crawford W. Long of Jefferson, Georgia. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
On June 12, 1869, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper published an engraving (left) of “The Ether Monument, in the Public Garden, Boston, Mass.” According to Leslie’s, the engraving was taken “From a Photograph by Whipple.” The “Ether Monument” would soon be nicknamed the “Either Monument” since either Bostonian, Dr. William T.G. Morton or Dr. Charles T. Jackson, could be hailed as the discoverer of anesthesia. From outside Boston, other priority claims were pressed for Drs. Horace Wells of Hartford, Connecticut, and Crawford W. Long of Jefferson, Georgia. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Park Ridge, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
On June 12, 1869, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper published an engraving (left) of “The Ether Monument, in the Public Garden, Boston, Mass.” According to Leslie’s, the engraving was taken “From a Photograph by Whipple.” The “Ether Monument” would soon be nicknamed the “Either Monument” since either Bostonian, Dr. William T.G. Morton or Dr. Charles T. Jackson, could be hailed as the discoverer of anesthesia. From outside Boston, other priority claims were pressed for Drs. Horace Wells of Hartford, Connecticut, and Crawford W. Long of Jefferson, Georgia. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
On June 12, 1869, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper published an engraving (left) of “The Ether Monument, in the Public Garden, Boston, Mass.” According to Leslie’s, the engraving was taken “From a Photograph by Whipple.” The “Ether Monument” would soon be nicknamed the “Either Monument” since either Bostonian, Dr. William T.G. Morton or Dr. Charles T. Jackson, could be hailed as the discoverer of anesthesia. From outside Boston, other priority claims were pressed for Drs. Horace Wells of Hartford, Connecticut, and Crawford W. Long of Jefferson, Georgia. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
On June 12, 1869, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper published an engraving (left) of “The Ether Monument, in the Public Garden, Boston, Mass.” According to Leslie’s, the engraving was taken “From a Photograph by Whipple.” The “Ether Monument” would soon be nicknamed the “Either Monument” since either Bostonian, Dr. William T.G. Morton or Dr. Charles T. Jackson, could be hailed as the discoverer of anesthesia. From outside Boston, other priority claims were pressed for Drs. Horace Wells of Hartford, Connecticut, and Crawford W. Long of Jefferson, Georgia. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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