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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   March 2014
The Bookplate of Paul M. Wood, M.D.
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   March 2014
The Bookplate of Paul M. Wood, M.D.
Anesthesiology 03 2014, Vol.120, 525. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000444100.85995.fe
Anesthesiology 03 2014, Vol.120, 525. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000444100.85995.fe
As a young boy, the future founder of the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (WLM), Paul Meyer Wood, was tutored in the art of designing bookplates by his mother, Louise Meyer Wood. Mrs. Wood would eventually be appointed as a professor of religious art and architecture at New York City’s Biblical Seminary. In designing his personal bookplate (above), Dr. Paul Wood included images of Morton’s ether inhaler, three books, a portable anesthesia machine, and a syringe, four images symbolizing simultaneously his anesthetic innovations and his collections of anesthesia-related items. Could Dr. Wood have purposefully juxtaposed the “E” and “L” (of “EX LIBRIS”) with the H-like top of the keyed tank of the tallest machine cylinder—to artistically approximate (90 degrees clockwise) the “WLM” acronym of the Wood Library-Museum? (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
As a young boy, the future founder of the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (WLM), Paul Meyer Wood, was tutored in the art of designing bookplates by his mother, Louise Meyer Wood. Mrs. Wood would eventually be appointed as a professor of religious art and architecture at New York City’s Biblical Seminary. In designing his personal bookplate (above), Dr. Paul Wood included images of Morton’s ether inhaler, three books, a portable anesthesia machine, and a syringe, four images symbolizing simultaneously his anesthetic innovations and his collections of anesthesia-related items. Could Dr. Wood have purposefully juxtaposed the “E” and “L” (of “EX LIBRIS”) with the H-like top of the keyed tank of the tallest machine cylinder—to artistically approximate (90 degrees clockwise) the “WLM” acronym of the Wood Library-Museum? (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
As a young boy, the future founder of the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (WLM), Paul Meyer Wood, was tutored in the art of designing bookplates by his mother, Louise Meyer Wood. Mrs. Wood would eventually be appointed as a professor of religious art and architecture at New York City’s Biblical Seminary. In designing his personal bookplate (above), Dr. Paul Wood included images of Morton’s ether inhaler, three books, a portable anesthesia machine, and a syringe, four images symbolizing simultaneously his anesthetic innovations and his collections of anesthesia-related items. Could Dr. Wood have purposefully juxtaposed the “E” and “L” (of “EX LIBRIS”) with the H-like top of the keyed tank of the tallest machine cylinder—to artistically approximate (90 degrees clockwise) the “WLM” acronym of the Wood Library-Museum? (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Park Ridge, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
As a young boy, the future founder of the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (WLM), Paul Meyer Wood, was tutored in the art of designing bookplates by his mother, Louise Meyer Wood. Mrs. Wood would eventually be appointed as a professor of religious art and architecture at New York City’s Biblical Seminary. In designing his personal bookplate (above), Dr. Paul Wood included images of Morton’s ether inhaler, three books, a portable anesthesia machine, and a syringe, four images symbolizing simultaneously his anesthetic innovations and his collections of anesthesia-related items. Could Dr. Wood have purposefully juxtaposed the “E” and “L” (of “EX LIBRIS”) with the H-like top of the keyed tank of the tallest machine cylinder—to artistically approximate (90 degrees clockwise) the “WLM” acronym of the Wood Library-Museum? (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
As a young boy, the future founder of the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (WLM), Paul Meyer Wood, was tutored in the art of designing bookplates by his mother, Louise Meyer Wood. Mrs. Wood would eventually be appointed as a professor of religious art and architecture at New York City’s Biblical Seminary. In designing his personal bookplate (above), Dr. Paul Wood included images of Morton’s ether inhaler, three books, a portable anesthesia machine, and a syringe, four images symbolizing simultaneously his anesthetic innovations and his collections of anesthesia-related items. Could Dr. Wood have purposefully juxtaposed the “E” and “L” (of “EX LIBRIS”) with the H-like top of the keyed tank of the tallest machine cylinder—to artistically approximate (90 degrees clockwise) the “WLM” acronym of the Wood Library-Museum? (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
As a young boy, the future founder of the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology (WLM), Paul Meyer Wood, was tutored in the art of designing bookplates by his mother, Louise Meyer Wood. Mrs. Wood would eventually be appointed as a professor of religious art and architecture at New York City’s Biblical Seminary. In designing his personal bookplate (above), Dr. Paul Wood included images of Morton’s ether inhaler, three books, a portable anesthesia machine, and a syringe, four images symbolizing simultaneously his anesthetic innovations and his collections of anesthesia-related items. Could Dr. Wood have purposefully juxtaposed the “E” and “L” (of “EX LIBRIS”) with the H-like top of the keyed tank of the tallest machine cylinder—to artistically approximate (90 degrees clockwise) the “WLM” acronym of the Wood Library-Museum? (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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